Tagged With fttdp

This morning, NBN released a list of the 10 most expensive fibre to the premises (FTTP) installations rolled out under its original network plan. Despite the company generally staying tight-lipped about 'commercial in confidence' information -- including in its reports to the Senate committee charged with keeping it in line -- it's clearly happy to publish data that supports its government-mandated multi-technology mix.

The tech that could revolutionise the roll-out of the National Broadband Network is one step closer to reality. The first installation of a FttDP -- or fibre to the curb -- connection has been completed in an NBN trial in Victoria, and the results are impressive.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

NBN needs to ditch copper-based Fibre to the Node, says lobby group Internet Australia, saying it is "essential for Australia's economic and social development" to abandon the technology in favour of Fibre to the distribution point.

And no, it says, it's not too late.

NBN has just released its third-quarter results, boasting what it calls "strong performance results across all key metrics" and a push towards hitting its full-year goals. What that means for you: the NBN is being rolled out more quickly, with twice as many premises hooked up as the same time last year.

When you sign up for the NBN in search of a broadband boost, telcos don't tend to mention the hassles you might have with your home phone line. Here are some questions you need to consider before you move your phone to the NBN.

The NBN is a complicated piece of technology -- the largest infrastructure project in Australian history. From its inception in 2007 as a mostly-fibre network to the multi-technology mix of 2017, it's evolved into a Byzantine mess both for customers to understand and for internet service providers to manage. The main pain point is congestion -- a lack of virtual capacity on the network that slows some connections to a crawl. It's bad enough that some smaller ISPs are provisioning their own networks rather than relying on existing backhaul from NBN and their own competitors.

Ongoing NBN installation faults have delayed the Hybrid Fibre Coaxial (HFC) rollout, while red tape has left hundreds of homes in broadband limbo for months – with relief finally on the way following Fairfax Media investigations.

The move comes as NBN pushes to accelerate the nationwide rollout, recently putting another 90,000 complicated connections on hold amid the growing complexity of the Multi-Technology Mix rollout.

After far too long a wait, Australia will finally have a regulator to officially monitor the country's mediocre internet connection speeds. Around 4000 premises will be part of the ACCC-run monitoring system, which will track performance at peak and off-peak times on fixed-line NBN connections.

Feeling a little bit confused by the stupidly complicated and ever-changing rollout of the National Broadband Network around the country? Us too, to be honest with you. Here's our quick guide to the different types of NBN that might be installed at your home or business.

Telstra has revealed it will publish stats on how fast NBN connections will be, in the absence of such information from the NBN organisation itself. At the moment there is no way consumers can find out what type of NBN technology will be used or what sort of speed to expect through the national broadband network at their home or business.

The NBN's Goldilocks technology of fibre to the distribution point (FttDP) -- sitting just right in between the convenience of fibre to the node (FttN) and the speed of fibre to the premises (FttP) -- is a step closer to becoming a reality in Australia. NBN calls the tech 'fibre to the curb' (FttC) for some unknown reason, rather than FttDP or fibre to the driveway, but it's earmarked Australia's own Netcomm Wireless as the supplier of tech for the future network build-out.

Customer complaints about NBN connections are up by 63 per cent, and complaints about NBN line faults are up nearly 150 per cent, according to the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman's 2015-16 annual report released today. The NBN now accounts for almost 12 per cent of TIO complaints, but there's also a good side to the news: we're not complaining as much about our mobile and landline telephones any more.

Shared from Kotaku

Last week, upstart Singaporean ISP MyRepublic launched an unlimited data, single speed tier plan on Australia's NBN. It has a 'gamer' variant of that plan, too, that it says is actually different -- not just branding, not just smoke and mirrors. It's talking about optimised latency for gaming, and optimised routes to popular servers.

We spoke to the man that promises to make it happen in Australia, and he has some choice words about how to fix the NBN, what Telstra and Optus are doing wrong, and how building a network for gamers is easy -- if you know what you're doing.

With well over a million properties actively connected to the NBN, Australia's national broadband network is apparently starting to accelerate the speed of its rollout: the government-owned company calls it "continuing momentum". What's interesting, though, is how many customers are opting for higher speed tiers, suggesting that people actually do want faster internet -- echoing the recent comments of upstart ISP MyRepublic, which says flawed copper-based technologies like fibre to the node are nowhere near future-proof.

The rollout of Australia's NBN will abandon almost all of Optus's HFC cable network that it paid $800 million for back in 2011, with up to 700,000 homes around the country instead being connected to the NBN through fibre to the distribution point -- a new technology that brings many of the advantages of fibre to the premises to a fibre to the node-style construction method.

The National Broadband Network released its 2016 yearly results today, showing the rollout "continues to exceed its connection and financial targets". A spokesperson for Senator Mitch Fifield, Minister for Communications says this is "the latest evidence of the benefits of the Coalition's faster, more affordable NBN rollout".