Tagged With expanding universe

Humans don't know much about the universe, but we do know that most of the gravity holding it together -- around 85 per cent of it -- comes from something we can't see or touch called dark matter. And some other force we can't see or touch, called dark energy, is simultaneously causing the universe to expand, at an ever-increasing rate. But our measurements that seek to nail down the effects of dark energy don't seem to be adding up.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Humans don't know much about the universe, but we do know that most of the gravity holding it together -- around 85 per cent of it -- comes from something we can't see or touch called dark matter. And some other force we can't see or touch, called dark energy, is simultaneously causing the universe to expand, at an ever-increasing rate. But our measurements that seek to nail down the effects of dark energy don't seem to be adding up.