Tagged With e3

Shared from Kotaku

One of the cooler things Kotaku stumbled across at E3 last week was over at the IndieCade booth. The Pixxl Maze from Hungary-based PirateGames is a cube made of 6 LED panels. While not quite 4K, the 32x32 resolution still cooks up some colourful glowing visuals.

There’s a lot we still don’t know about Google’s forthcoming streaming game service Stadia, and we won’t know some of it until it’s available in the wild. But in a controlled demo of Stadia at E3, I was treated to a solid experience, as well as some fresh information about how the company plans to deliver Stadia to people with bad internet. And even better, I played the latest and greatest Doom right on a Pixelbook. No weird hacks. No fussy apps. Just me and a whole bunch of monsters on Mars.

Sony and Google have spared few details about their next-gen video game systems, but Microsoft has been quieter about how it plans to deliver games in the future. Sure we heard a few details about the console, codenamed Scarlett, and the cloud service, xCloud. We know these things exist. We just haven’t known what they’d look like, how powerful they’d be, or how xCloud and Project Scarlett might work together.

Today, at the Microsoft Theatre in downtown LA, Microsoft finally started giving us details.

The standard Xbox controller makes a lot of assumptions. It assumes you have two hands to hold it. It assumes you have two thumbs. It assumes you have a fluid range of motion to get to all of the buttons, that you have the reach to get to bumpers and triggers, and that you have the endurance to hold it.

And if you can't do any of that, there's a barrier that means you may not be able to play the games you'd love to play. That's why Xbox created the Xbox Adaptive Controller.

E3 2018 is here, and companies have already announced more games than you can shake a Joy-Con at. But what about consoles? The last few years have seen E3 inundated with either rumours or news about new consoles from the big three. This year's gaming expo has been a touch on the lighter side when it comes to hardware announcements, but still had an interesting reveal or two from the show's biggest players. Depending on your console of choice, that might be a good thing.

E3 is like a holiday for gamers, but sometimes it seems like PC fans get a little shortchanged, because aside from a handful of ports, much of the show is devoted to consoles. So to help balance things out, Lenovo is showing off its line of revamped Legion gaming PCs, both laptops and desktops, featuring updated components and all-new designs.

During the recent E3 Xbox Conference, Executive President of Gaming at Microsoft Phil Spencer briefly mentioned his team working to use Artificial Intelligence "in new ways".

I sat down with the man himself to find out exactly what the plan is. How can future AI benefit games, and the people who make them?