Tagged With diphoton mania

When physicists at the Large Hadron Collider announced the detection of a possible, unexpected new particle last December, we advised caution, since most such hints go away when more data comes in. We won't know for sure until this winter whether it's real, or just random noise in the data masquerading as a signal. While we're waiting, physicist David Kaplan lays out all the science for you in a new video for Quanta.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

When physicists at the Large Hadron Collider announced the detection of a possible, unexpected new particle last December, we advised caution, since most such hints go away when more data comes in. We won't know for sure until this winter whether it's real, or just random noise in the data masquerading as a signal. While we're waiting, physicist David Kaplan lays out all the science for you in a new video for Quanta.