Tagged With diet

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Before you jump on the gluten free bandwagon, a review has found that only a small proportion of Australians who claim to feel rubbish after eating gluten are likely to be truly sensitive to gluten or wheat.

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Humans have been eating other humans since the beginning of time, but the motivations behind this macabre practice are complex and often unclear. Some anthropologists say prehistoric cannibals were just trying to grab a nutritious snack, but new research shows that human flesh -- as tasty as it is -- doesn't pack the same caloric punch as wild animals. In other words, cannibalism wasn't worth the trouble given alternatives.

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Depriving ourselves of food to the point of near-starvation doesn't sound very appealing, but it could prolong our lives and prevent the onset of age-related diseases. A combined analysis of two long-running studies shows that caloric restriction does indeed work in monkeys, hinting at its potential to work in humans. More research is needed before we can be sure this translates to humans, so you should probably avoid any drastic dietary measures for now.

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I know that you want to get healthy this year, because it's the most popular New Year's resolution. Plenty of people want to help you, too, with everything from diet tips to exercise suggestions. They will tell you to make some lifestyle changes, to download a new app or even to buy a wearable fitness tracker (those probably don't work, by the way). But with lots of advice floating around, there are bound to be bad suggestions -- those rooted in confirmation bias, trendiness and pretty much anything except scientific evidence.

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We ate some weird stuff in 2016. A person born in the year 1000 AD definitely wouldn't comprehend a Dorito. He certainly wouldn't understand why kids love the taste of Cinnamon Toast Crunch, and if you showed him a Twinkie, he'd probably burn you at the stake. But the way things are headed, our food is bound to get a lot weirder.

10

I can't button up my jeans and it's all my stupid jerk brain's fault. I can blame my brain - instead of my complete inability to say no to cheese - thanks to a Queensland nueroscientist, who says it is all down to brainpower, rather than willpower.

Feel free to steal this as an excuse.

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A study by The University of Western Australia of foods labelled "gluten-free" -- published this week in the Medical Journal of Australia -- has found that some produced overseas do not comply with the Australian standard that requires GF-labelled foods to contain "no detectable gluten".

9

What should you cut out of your diet to be more healthy? Everything. According to the most popular diet books on the market, there's barely a food on Earth that's safe to eat. But what is the actual benefit of these diets? Here's what science has to say.

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Archaeologists have discovered a treasure trove of ancient stone tools at a dig near Azraq, Jordan, some of which still contain traces of animal residue. A number of food items on this bona fide paleolithic menu will be familiar to the modern eater, while others, well, not so much.

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An analysis by Tufts University researchers has failed to find a link between butter consumption and cardiovascular disease. And hallelujah to that -- the ongoing hysteria against butter can now finally come to an end.

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A critical discovery about how bacteria feed on an unusual sugar molecule found in leafy green vegetables could hold the key to explaining how 'good' bacteria protect our gut and promote health. The finding suggests that leafy greens are essential for feeding good gut bacteria, limiting the ability of bad bacteria to colonise the gut by shutting them out of the prime 'real estate'.