Tagged With deepfakes

History is rife with fakes. In 1983, the German magazine Stern announced that it had acquired previously undocumented diaries written by Hitler, a find British historian Hugh Trevor-Roper initially heralded as “an archive of great historical significance.” In reality, however, an illustrator named Konrad Kujau had penned the volumes himself. Thanks to the scrutiny of historians at the German Federal Archive, they were soon revealed to be forgeries and the so-called “Hitler Diaries” became a cautionary tale about media frenzies.

Deepfakes, ultrarealistic fake videos manipulated using machine learning, are getting pretty convincing. And researchers continue to develop new methods to create these types of videos, for better or, more likely, for worse.

The most recent method comes from researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, who have figured out a way to automatically transfer the “style” of one person to another.

The labour union representing Hollywood's actors, singers and other media artists wants to make sure its members aren't digitally manipulated into porn stars without their consent. In the most recent issue of its union magazine, the Screen Actors Guild-American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (SAG-AFTRA) said it's "closely watching the development of so-called deepfakes," Deadline reports.

As America's descent into national madness continues, some have been sounding warning bells about a possible "fake news apocalypse" - the idea that technology is making it easier than ever to generate disinformation and propaganda and quickly disseminate it to legions of people online, with little checks on the process. Something that's particularly worrying are machine learning algorithms that are quickly making it possible to generate fake videos of public figures saying things they didn't with uncanny audiovisual accuracy.

Last week, The Times of London teamed up with a tech company and a creative agency to digitally recreate "the speech JFK would have made in Dallas had he not been assassinated." The Dallas Trade Mart speech never happened - Kennedy was killed the day he was supposed to deliver it - but thanks to artificial intelligence, you can now listen to "JFK" give the 22-minute speech in his own voice.

There's a long list of things wrong with the Justice League movie, not the least of which being the hasty and poorly-executed digital removal of Henry Cavill's moustache that he couldn't shave during the film's reshoots. But not to worry, some random dude on the internet with a $500 used PC and a world-changing AI just fixed at least one part of that film.