Tagged With coal

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Mylan is one of the most loathsome companies on Earth. Usually, they are hated for charging people with life-threatening allergies extortionate amounts of money for the only drug on the market that can help them. But a new report points out that there are many other reasons to hate the company. Namely, contributing to air pollution while they sell drugs to help people with respiratory problems.

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Indian multinational conglomerate Adani has given the go-ahead for work to start on its huge, controversial Carmichael mine in Queensland's Galilee Basin. While the move is being called out as a stunt — with many questioning where the funding for the project is coming from — it still beggars belief that the project has got this far at a time when our focus should be on investing in renewables and keeping our mineral resources in the ground.

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America's coal mining industry has cooled down in recent years. It lost over 200,000 jobs between 2014 and 2016; the latest sorry statistic to cap what's been a massive downward trend for decades. Expounding on his plan to restore the industry in the "America First Energy Plan", Trump has promised increased fossil fuel production and environmental deregulation. He's also committed, time and again, to an obscure and speculative technology called "clean coal", which, in his mind, probably sounds like a win-win for jobs and the environment. Policy and environmental experts, however, say it is neither.

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In the autumn of 1917, a severe coal shortage hit the United States. Riots even broke out over the lack of energy as the nation went into the winter months. Some people were calling for conservation, but one snarky newspaper article insisted that conserving was for suckers. Why? People of the future — specifically, the people of 100 years hence — wouldn't be using coal anyway.

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Like a smoker who keeps trying to quit but sneaks a drag when he thinks nobody's looking, China is slowly weaning itself off coal. Last winter, the Chinese government released preliminary statistics showing that its coal consumption had dropped 2.9 per cent in 2014. But that number may be obfuscating the truth about China's coal use — and about how quickly its carbon emissions are declining.