Tagged With ces 2018

The world's biggest whirlwind of tech, startups and wild fever dreams is finally over, at least for this year. But before we close the book on CES 2018, we wanted to call attention to some of the coolest, most exciting things we saw at the show. That's because even in a down year that saw less new laptops, and the hottest tech trend (for the second year in a row) was companies trying to shove Alexa or Google Assistant into every single device, there's still a lot to look forward to over the next 12 months.

This might look like a TV. It's a big 165cm display capable of HDR and putting out 1000 nits of brightness. It even uses a quantum dot film to achieve DCI-P3 colour gamut, which is nerd speak for really good colour reproduction that's usually only found super expensive TVs. But this display is one of three new Big Format Gaming Displays Nvidia announced at CES. This thing is meant to be a gaming monitor first, and yes, shockingly, that does make a difference.

Do you remember back in the '90s, when high-definition TVs first started to become popular? Seeing that HD for the first time, the sharpness seemed almost impossible compared to existing technology. But this year, several top tech companies showed off 8K screens with 16-times as many pixels as those old 1080p HD TVs. For me, seeing these new super sharp TVs at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) felt like the first time all over again.

I chuckled when I was first briefed about Razer's latest concept, Project Linda. It's a phone dock that turns the Razer Phone into a laptop! That concept has been done before, and it has always been deeply and profoundly stupid. But Razer's take on the dumb idea has just enough polish, even in this concept stage, to actually feel kind of cool.

It doesn't look special. At a glance, it's just a Razer gaming mouse sitting on a Razer gaming pad - which means everything is black except for some bright, colourful lights. But then you pick the mouse up and it's way too light to be wireless. After ten seconds the cursor on screen flickers and the lights on the mouse turn off. It's disconnected because this mouse, the Razer Mamba Hyperflux, powers itself entirely from the mousepad. There's no battery in the thing at all.

After the latest MacBook Pro refresh failed to deliver the kind of features buyers really wanted, Apple's competitors sensed weaknesss. Instead of an overabundance of USB-C ports and gimmicky touch screens above the keyboard, systems like the new Spectre x360 15 are hoping to entice users back to PC land by offering way better flexibility, faster performance and the ability to live life dongle-free.

Videos shot on smartphones have a very specific, very low-rent aesthetic. A whole host of stabilizers are available on the market that try to improve that aesthetic - eradicating the shaky cam look so you can actually see whatever the smartphone's camera is looking at. DJI even has one! The original Osmo Mobile was a pricey handheld stabiliser with some good ideas and a whole lot of big flaws. The Osmo Mobile 2, announced today, looks like it improves on almost every point of contention, and even better, DJI has slashed the price. This thing costs just $209.

So much about Henrik Fisker's EMotion concept unveiled at CES this year is both exciting and, for now at least, almost completely untested. Those eye-catching butterfly doors, for example? Fisker still has to figure out how to produce them at scale. He still, also, needs to get a factory. And then there's the battery, a version of which Fisker says will ultimately have a range of 805km or more, though we might not see that one for years.

Every major VR player has made the same promise. A VR headset that would be completely wireless. One that would let you go anywhere without tripping over cords or being tethered to a computer/phone/PS4. Google, which has spent more than a year quietly improving its VR platform, Daydream, is now the first company to cross the standalone finish line. The Daydream-powered Lenovo Mirage Solo is a beauty.

The new, modular Technics SP-10R turntable plays records just like any other turntable. But, according to Technics, it plays records really, really, really well. It better since it's priced at $US10,000 and up depending on just how you configure it. But the introduction of yet another Technics tribute model - or collector's item if you're being honest with yourself - makes you wonder. What exactly is this legendary audio company trying to do?

After covering CES for 10 years, nothing I've seen at the show has me as excited about the future as Ossia's wireless charging technology. The company's developed a way to deliver power to your gadgets the same way internet is delivered by wi-fi, and one of the first real-world applications of the tech is a AA battery that may never need replacing.

One of the recent trends in Bluetooth speakers is the addition of colourful LEDs that blink and flash along with whatever music's playing. But a company called Victrola has done something way out of left field by putting an animated Pin Art display on top of its new wireless speaker.