Tagged With astronomy

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The National Weather Service says that the most likely explanation for an object which sent out illumination and a sonic boom throughout southwest Michigan, five other US states, and Canada on Tuesday night local time was the breakup of a meteor, WXYZ reported. The American Meteor Society collected at least 200 reports of the incident, which for around a second was so bright it lit parts of the Detroit region like it was daytime.

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There's an unidentified source of infrared throughout the universe. By looking at the specific wavelengths of the light, scientists think that come from carbon - but not just any carbon, a special kind where the atoms are arranged in multiple hexagonal rings. No one has been able to spot one of these multi-ring "polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons," or PAHs in space - even though the infrared emissions imply that these PAHs should make up 10 per cent of the universe's carbon. Now, scientists have found a new hint.

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To date, the best use of augmented reality has been running around parks trying to capture virtual Pokémon. But as that fad has (mercifully) faded away, a company called AstroReality has come up with a more compelling use of AR technology that works with an astonishingly detailed replica of the moon that's as much a work of art as it is a learning tool.

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First detected in 2002, Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are quick, high-energy pulses originating from galaxies billions of light years away. Scientists still don't know the true nature of these bursts or what's causing them, but new observations of the only known repeating FRBs are providing details about the extreme environments in which these pulses are born.

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Astronomers spend their days looking at the sky. Maybe some crazy complex new telescope is helping, or some form of AI is teasing the complexities out of vast piles of data. It's still just the sky. The sky isn't immutable, though. Some of the most interesting science happens when brief blips pass into and out of existence. These dots send their light in the form of radio waves, microwaves, visible light and gamma rays into measuring apparatuses and tell us something new about the universe. They might even send space itself rippling with gravitational waves.

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On October 19, 2017, astronomers witnessed the first known interstellar asteroid - a bizarre, cigar-shaped rock that, just as quickly as it entered into our Solar System, exited in a hurry. Not satisfied that 'Oumuamua, as it's been named, is just an odd asteroid, astronomers from Breakthrough Listen recently tuned their Green Bank telescope into the object to see if it's an alien spaceship or some kind of probe. The preliminary results are now in and - brace yourself - it's still a rock.

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NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is currently hurtling towards MU69, a Kuiper Belt object located around 1.6 billion km past Pluto. Details of this distant object just keep getting more intriguing. In addition to having a reddish hue and potentially consisting of two self-orbiting objects, MU69 may have a small moon, the latest research suggests. So what we once thought was a single object might actually be three.