Tagged With amd

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After kicking the Vega can down the road at Computex earlier this year, AMD finally unveiled its Vega series of GPUs at the SIGGRAPH event in Los Angeles. Three cards were unveiled: the Radeon RX Vega 56, an air cooled GPU available for $US399, as well as air cooled and water cooled iterations of the Radeon RX Vega 64.

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NVIDIA has pushed out the GTX 1080 Ti and lately we've seen the launch of the RX 500 series cards.

But it's really AMD's Vega GPUs that people have been holding out for. Earlier this morning the company confirmed it would start shipping the first Vega GPUs - although not the consumer cards people are expecting - from the end of next month - and as an added bonus, there's a new 16 core CPU to boot.

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If you have any interest in PC gaming, you've likely heard about two competing technologies by NVIDIA and AMD called G-Sync and FreeSync respectively. Both are designed to eliminate screen tearing, which happens when your monitor's refresh rate can't keep up with the frames being pumped out by your video card. If you've been looking for a definitive comparison, look no further than this opus from Battle(non)sense.

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For nearly a decade, common sense has dictated that most people don't need a standalone graphics card in their computer. Gamers need them to make rich titles like Rise of the Tomb Raider hum, and some professionals, like video editors and 3D designers, need them to take the pain out of rendering huge multimedia files. For everyone else, a video card has been treated more like a luxury item than a necessary computer component. But AMD's $130 Radeon RX 550, a graphics card that costs a little more than the brand new games you'll render on it, is such a good value that it might make you rethink the notion that a graphics card is a splurge you should skip.

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Virtual reality finally arrived. Self-driving cars started wandering streets and past red lights. SpaceX aborted a rocket launch four times within a week. Samsung started strong with the Galaxy S7 and finished with the Note7 nuking itself into orbit while you slept.

We had new graphics cards, and most of them were pretty damn good. Consoles broke the mould by releasing new hardware mid-cycle and becoming more like PCs than ever before. And, unsurprisingly, we found out once again that Einstein really knew his shit.

It's been a big year for tech. Let's break down this year's biggest moments.

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It's always easier to replace a video card than it is a CPU and motherboard, so it's not surprising to find people with a GTX 1060 or RX 480 surrounded by comparatively ancient components. These setups are sacrificing some performance by bottle-necking their GPU, sure, but exactly how much is going to waste?

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Looking to upgrade your computer with a graphics card that can handle VR, or you're looking to build a PC on the cheap for gaming at 1080p with a bit of dabbling at 1440p resolutions? That's the crowd AMD is trying to hit with their new Radeon RX 480, and it manages to do so admirably.

But just like games, you'll want to make sure you get the best possible deal. So to help you out, here's a list of some of the cheapest RX 480's in the country.