Tagged With ajit pai

Ever since the US FCC voted to repeal net neutrality last December, we've seen the protections for a free and open internet declared dead more than once. On Monday, the rules "officially" come off the books. The reality is net neutrality is on life support and there's still reason to believe it will return.

If all goes as the USbFCC's Republican commissioners planned, December 14 will be known as the day that net neutrality died in the US. But thanks to the mercifully slow gears of the federal bureaucracy, big changes don't happen immediately. On Thursday, the US Federal Communications Commission's repeal of net neutrality protections is scheduled to hit the federal register. Sixty days later, it will be official. But there's a lot happening in the meantime.

Two weeks ago, residents of Hawaii kissed their loved ones goodbye or huddled in confusion after emergency warnings of an incoming ballistic missile threat were sent out in error. Forty minutes later, they were told it was all a mistake, and that an employee clicked the wrong button. But an FCC investigation has concluded that wasn't actually what happened.

Under the tenure of its new Donald Trump-appointed chair Ajit Pai, the US Federal Communications Commission recently revoked Barack Obama-era regulations mandating service providers abide by net neutrality rules. But on the way there, the agency had to overlook millions of allegedly fraudulent comments submitted to its Electronic Comment Filing System - likely corrupting one of the only methods for the public to make its voice heard during the rule-making process.

Under chairman Ajit Pai, the FCC has had a lot of stupid initiatives that would only serve the interests of telecoms. Ranking high on the list was a plan to redefine speed requirements for fixed broadband to include slower mobile connections. As of Thursday, that plan appears to be dead. But never say never.

Senate Democrats are getting serious about overruling the FCC's recent decision to kill net neutrality protections. Republican Senator Susan Collins has joined 49 Democrats in the endorsement of a legislative measure that would reverse the FCC's ruling. Only one more vote is necessary for the measure to pass the Senate.