Tagged With ajit pai

Asked only once at a Senate hearing today about the fake security incident that’s needled his agency for more than a year, the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Ajit Pai, acknowledged for the first time knowing secretly for several months that his office likely fed US lawmakers false information.

Set to appear before a Senate oversight committee this week, Ajit Pai will face a barrage of questions about why senior officials at the agency he leads, the Federal Communications Commission, provided false information to Congress—a federal crime, punishable by up to five years in prison, had it been proved they did so knowingly.

In a statement this week, the US FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said that he was “deeply disappointed” that the agency’s former chief information officer, David Bray, provided “inaccurate information” about an alleged cyber attack on the FCC’s comment system last summer as the agency was considering new rules to overturn Obama-era net neutrality protections.

Ever since the US FCC voted to repeal net neutrality last December, we've seen the protections for a free and open internet declared dead more than once. On Monday, the rules "officially" come off the books. The reality is net neutrality is on life support and there's still reason to believe it will return.

If all goes as the USbFCC's Republican commissioners planned, December 14 will be known as the day that net neutrality died in the US. But thanks to the mercifully slow gears of the federal bureaucracy, big changes don't happen immediately. On Thursday, the US Federal Communications Commission's repeal of net neutrality protections is scheduled to hit the federal register. Sixty days later, it will be official. But there's a lot happening in the meantime.

Two weeks ago, residents of Hawaii kissed their loved ones goodbye or huddled in confusion after emergency warnings of an incoming ballistic missile threat were sent out in error. Forty minutes later, they were told it was all a mistake, and that an employee clicked the wrong button. But an FCC investigation has concluded that wasn't actually what happened.