Tagged With 2018

There's being into video gaming and there's identifying as a hardcore gamer. Both are fine! But the latter group has developed a well-earned reputation for being rife with bigoted jerks, from the whole mess over Gamergate to more recent instances like PewDiePie's repeated instances of racism. It's also not a coincidence that hardware manufacturers have long learned to appeal to hardcore gamers with branding exercises that could be described as Mountain Dew with an extra spoonful of cringe.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Scientifically speaking, April Fools' Day is the worst day of the year. And as consumers we have only two options to survive the horror that is brands flogging the dead horse known as April Fools' Day. The first is to humour them by politely chuckling at their whipping of the stallion's corpse.

The second is to saddle up and ride that poor, rotting pony -- pretending it's alive until these brands provide us with the products and services they're offering.

But honestly, some of the products that brands advertise on April Fools' Day sound pretty nice. Like Virgin Australia's Kids Class cabin? No more screaming children kicking the back of your seat? Sign me the hell up.

Brilliant. Artist Bruce Yan remixes the logos of famous brands by inserting the cartoon characters we grew up with. So the Playboy bunny becomes a profile view of Bugs Bunny, the mermaid in the Starbucks Logo becomes Ariel, Charlie Brown is the BIC guy and so on. The twists are super clever and fun.

Since advertising is all about the power of suggestion, it's fun to see what happens when the conceits of well-known campaigns are totally undermined. Honest Slogans takes well-known advertising and turns the slogan into some real talk about the product, or at least designer Clif Dickens's take on it.

According to a recent article on Smithsonian.com, the notion that poison candy is routinely distributed to unsuspecting children on Halloween is a myth perpetrated by advice columnists Dear Abby and Ann Landers in the 1980s and '90s. But historically, candy meant for young consumers has sported poisonous-sounding, WTF wrappers and packages that most self-respecting 2013 parents would be dismayed to see dumped out of their children's trick-or-treat bags.

Pixar's production logo -- that animation sequence that pops up before a Pixar movie -- is as iconic as they come. Who can't help but smile when they see cute little Luxo Jr. squash the I in Pixar and turn its bulb towards you. But the Pixar logo animation wasn't always so adorable, a few of Pixar's early shorts had much plainer sequences. Jay Orca combined a lot of them into this wonderful 3-minute video showing the history of Pixar's logo.

In what could possibly be the most convoluted way to put on a new pair of purple pants, Yahoo has announced that it will be changing its infamous purple exclamation point logo into... something different. You see, it's not the new simple logo above even though Yahoo posted an image of that new logo in a release talking about the new logo and used that same new logo all over its Tumblr page and is even using that new logo on Yahoo.com. No, no, no. That, I repeat, is not the new logo.