Entertainment Reviews

1

Thor: Ragnarok is the funniest Marvel movie to date. In fact, it may be the funniest superhero movie ever. From the first scene until the very last, it's a non-stop cavalcade of jokes wrapped around an epic, sweeping space adventure. The whole thing will make you absolutely giddy.

0

In Happy Death Day, a college student is forced to relive her birthday over and over again. That sounds nice, except for the fact that she's always, always, murdered at the end of it. To stop the loop, she'll have to figure out who is killing her.

16

I've never actually met Seth MacFarlane, so saying I don't like the guy isn't a personal dig. I've just never been a fan of his style of comedy, especially Family Guy (hate it) and the Ted movies (ugh). And yet somehow I'm enjoying the hell out of The Orville, his new live-action Star Trek homage.

0

When Amazon released the Kindle Oasis back in the spring of 2016, we said it was the best e-reader ever made. But that doesn't mean it was perfect, and in the year and half since it came out, it's become clear there was room for improvement.

With a starting price of $449, the old Oasis was a bit pricey, it had a blocky (and now outdated) design and it was missing features like the adaptive backlighting found on the even older Kindle Voyage. And despite having a name that immediately conjures up visions of pools and fountains, the previous Oasis didn't have any sort of water resistance either. But now, Amazon is giving it another go with the simply (and annoyingly) named New Kindle Oasis, which looks to address all those shortcomings while also adding a number of new improvements too.

6

Blade Runner 2049 is like staying up all night to finish a 150,000-word fanfic that you started reading, thought was good but not great, and then just kept reading because you'd committed to it, goddammit. And then the next morning, as you struggle bleary-eyed through the work day, you keep wondering if it was worth it.

14

The third episode "Context Is for Kings" is the first true episode of Discovery, and it's a big improvement over the two-episode TV movie that kicked off the series last week. The characters are more interesting now, the ideas smarter, and the world better understood. Granted, I may be biased because it's also examining a Trek issue I've been dying to see tackled.

0

78/52 is a 90-minute film about one minute. Actually, it's only about 52 specific seconds, along with the 78 different shots contained within, that make up the shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock's classic horror thriller Psycho. The film is solely about breaking down the scene's genius and importance, and it takes the term "deep dive" to a whole new level.

2

Flatliners is a remarkable film. Specifically, it's remarkable in that it takes an intriguing and ripe concept and does almost nothing with it. Instead, it fulfils the promise of its title by offering up a boring, lifeless story, fills it with dull, unsympathetic characters, and then keeps the thrills to an absolute minimum.

7

Wireless earbuds are all the rage right now. And there's a good reason for that -- wires are annoying. Jaybird has a new pair of truly wire-free Bluetooth 'buds called the RUN, and it shouldn't take you too long to guess what they're made for.

0

The first season of Channel Zero, Syfy's creepypasta-inspired anthology series, explored the nightmares of Candle Cove, a sinister TV puppet show. Season two, No-End House, features a new story, a new cast, and an even more dreadful evil. If you thrill to mind-warping horror stories, you do not want to miss this.

5

The Lego Ninjago Movie starts like a strobe light and ends like a night light. At first, it's bright, loud, fast, and in your face -- a constant barrage of visuals and sounds. Then it slows down considerably, focusing on the story and character development. One part is better than the other but neither is great, and, unlike Legos, they just don't fit together.

9

Imagine you were 10 years old and given five minutes to tear through a toy store. You'd sprint in, grab everything you wanted, and fall down from exhaustion at the end. It would be an amazing time, but with so much happening so fast, what would the real, lasting memory be? That experience, in movie form, is Kingsman: The Golden Circle.

0

It's been a long time coming to theatres, but It turns out to have been worth the wait. The cinematic adaptation of what is arguably Stephen King's most famous novel is absolutely an excellent horror film, but its real success is how it exceeds just horror -- it's dramatic, funny, and, most impressively, has way more heart than any movie about a terrifying clown should manage to have.