Online

0

In what appears to be a violation of the federal ethics rule that prohibits a government employee from using "his public office for his own private gain, for the endorsement of any product," Ajit Pai, the controversial new chair of the FCC, tweeted and subsequently deleted praise for Amazon's PrimeNow service.

"Needed something in pinch and decided to try @amazonprimenow. Very impressed! Item was cheap and arrived early. May not leave the house again," Pai posted to on his official FCC Twitter account, only to delete moments later.

0

If your business has a fixed-line Internet connection through Telstra, you might be having some problems talking to the outside world right now. Australia's largest telco is experiencing a bit of a hiccup with its Chatswood exchange again, which is apparently impacting hardline business connections around the state of NSW.

0

Uber is not known for treating its drivers particularly well, but it gets worse: According to allegations from ex-engineer Susan J. Fowler, the ridesharing app has a culture of misogyny, and threatened to fire her after she reported sexual harassment. Uber CEO Travis Kalanick has already responded to the allegations, saying in a statement to Gizmodo, "What she describes is abhorrent and against everything Uber stands for and believes in."

2

AFL fans around the country have long come to terms with the fact that, when it comes to modern broadcasting technology, the sport steadfastly lives 50 years in the past. True, free-to-air finally moved to proper high definition video last year, but now the AFL and Telstra have stuffed up the digital side of things, restricting the maximum size one can watch the stream on mobile devices to "iPhone size".

0

On Friday, Mark Zuckerberg published an updated founder's letter for Facebook, his first since the company went public in 2012. Largely summarising the CEO's previous comments, the sweeping manifesto was newsworthy while containing little news. In at least one version of the text, however, Zuckerberg wrote about using artificial intelligence for online surveillance — a line stricken from the final draft.

0

For a long time, Google Fiber was the most exciting US broadband provider out there. Cities wanted it; tech people drooled over it; and, on a loftier level, it even promised to help bridge the "digital divide" between rich and poor. But now, things are looking bleak: Yesterday, Bloomberg reported that Google Fiber is being scaled back dramatically (again) as it named Greg McCray its new CEO, with "several hundred" of its employees in that division being sent to other areas of the company.