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The personal data of 8,500 employees at The Department of Social Services was breached - and left open - from June 2016 to October 2017.

The data included names, phone numbers, emails, passwords, and credit card information. According to Australian Greens Senator Rachel Siewert, the breach demonstrates the risks of outsourcing work on sensitive material to private contractors.

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Review site TripAdvisor may have frantically backpedaled after a Milwaukee Sentinel-Journal expose showed that it had a habit of censoring reviews mentioning blackouts, rape, and suspicious deaths or injuries incurred at certain resorts - specifically Mexican ones, though it remains unclear if other destinations were involved - by adding new functionality warning of potentially dangerous hotels. But the site's belated admission it did wrong might not be enough for the US Federal Trade Commission, which the Sentinel reported this week is potentially investigating whether Tripadvisor acted improperly.

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Google, along with fellow tech giants such as Amazon, Facebook and Twitter, has drawn increasing scrutiny this year over concerns that its "concentrated authority resembles the divine right of kings," as the New York Times put it. In recent months, it's faced stumbling blocks when it returned misinformation and conspiracy theories during crises such as mass shootings, and became embroiled in the ever-expanding Russian electoral interference scandal. But one particularly disturbing note concerned Google subsidiary YouTube and its YouTube Kids section, which everyone seems to have recently realised was promoting weird-arse, creepy content to children via algorithmically suggested videos and a seeming lack of moderation.

Shared from Lifehacker

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Over the last few months, the ACCC has been telling RSPs to ensure that their ads accurately represent what sorts of speeds customers can realistically expect from their NBN connection. But this isn't a new problem - anyone with an ADSL connection knows it's a game of roulette guessing what sorts of networks speeds to you'll get depending on proximity to an exchange, the quality of the copper and time of day. However, the ACCC has put RSPs on notice, telling them that misleading ads will see them come down hard.

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Facebook is creating a tool that will allow users to check whether or not they followed Russian propaganda accounts on Facebook or Instagram during the 2016 US election cycle, the company announced today. The tool, which is expected to launch by the end of this year, is a response to continued pressure from lawmakers who have demanded that Facebook be more transparent about election meddling on its platform.

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While many cryptocoins seek to transcend conventional currency, the cryptocurrency Tether claims to back each of its issued tokens with an equal amount of redeemable cash held in a private reserve. That keeps its value predictable, but presents a problem if a token is stolen from one of the company's "treasury" wallets. Today, Token's development team has exactly 30,950,010 problems.

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A few weeks ago, Jordan Belfort - the notorious "Wolf of Wall Street" and convicted financial scam artist - warned the entire internet not to get into sketchy cryptocurrency-backed startups. Specifically, he warned that initial coin offerings, a form of almost completely unregulated investment vehicle where crypto-backed startups offer blockchain-based "tokens" in exchange for things of real value like cash, were the "biggest scam ever, such a huge gigantic scam that's going to blow up in so many people's faces".

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When the Apple Watch launched in 2015, Belle Gibson was touted by Apple as a star. Not only had Gibson supposedly cured her own cancer through healthy eating, she now had an app for both the iPhone and Apple Watch that could help others do the same. But now that her own cancer and "cure" have been exposed as fake, people are asking what responsibility Apple had to the public.