Gaming

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

"Awhile back, someone gave me a CD of 8-bit video game music," Run Hundred founder Chris Lawhorn says. "I gave the CD a listen in the car, which was surreal–as it made me feel like I was in a driving video game."

But could this have the same effect for a workout playlist while you're going for a run, or lifting weights? Yep.

A video game intended to help people become less susceptible to misinformation just rewarded me for pretending to post a tweet from a fake NASA account warning of an incoming meteorite. The object of the new browser game, Bad News, is "to get as many followers as you can while slowly building up fake credibility as a news site," according to its site.

By now, about 80 per cent of people have already given up on their New Year's resolutions. Luckily, resolutions don't mean crap and you can try to reach your goal again whenever the hell you want. For those who've been wanting to work on their physical health, Darebee has released its highly-anticipated space opera fitness role-playing game, Carbon and Dust, which by the way is totally free.

Shared from Kotaku

A couple of days ago, a Twitter bot posted a screenshot from a video game called "StarTribes: Myth of the Dragon Lord". Except, no such game exists. It took some digging from Amberle, an eagle-eyed follower of the bot, to track down the image's likely origin: 1992's Laser Lords. The problem is, the contents of the screenshot never appeared in the final game.

First answer: it's easier to buy one. And that's cool. But there are people who, given a Raspberry Pi, a 3D printer and a stick of chewing gum, are going to build their own facsimile running emulation software so they can play whatever they like. Christopher Foote is one such person. The fruits of his labour: the "PiSwitch".

Video: The most entertaining part of watching the modern Olympics is hoping you catch some kind of drama, scandal or debacle. And while the IOC has hoped that the addition of new sports such as mixed doubles curling will breathe new life into the games, the Olympics should instead introduce sports such as mixed doubles interactive Pong - now that I'd stay up late to watch.

Few creative mediums let you explore stories like video games. Players don't just watch a story - they participate in it, sometimes steering narratives to wildly divergent endings. But in order for an interactive experience to truly transport players, it needs to have a well-built world for them to live in. Here are some locales that stand out from the rest.

Companies such as Sony and Nvidia have tried to make game streaming a thing for years, so gamers can skip the download process entirely and instead stream games from the cloud. But only recently has the tech been good enough to make it feasible. Sony has PS Now, which can stream games over the internet to a PS4 or PC, while Nvidia's GeForce Now service does the same thing for the company's Shield devices or a modern computer with an Nvidia GPU.