Gadgets

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After a brief holiday hiatus, Toy Aisle makes its triumphant return with an exclusive first look at a new collectable from DC Comics that fans of The New Teen Titans will want to start saving for. We also have the easiest way to build your own ship-in-a-bottle courtesy of LEGO, and something for Star Trek: Discovery fans looking to recreate epic Federation vs. Klingon space battles at their desks, instead of actually working.

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With arguably the biggest player in the Action Camera market apparently struggling to keep itself afloat, we're likely going to see a few more action cameras on the cheaper side around the traps, like this Bauhn Action Camera that'll be going at ALDI for just $69.

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The world's biggest whirlwind of tech, startups and wild fever dreams is finally over, at least for this year. But before we close the book on CES 2018, we wanted to call attention to some of the coolest, most exciting things we saw at the show. That's because even in a down year that saw less new laptops, and the hottest tech trend (for the second year in a row) was companies trying to shove Alexa or Google Assistant into every single device, there's still a lot to look forward to over the next 12 months.

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Until recently, "Alexa, play 90's alternative radio on Pandora" was probably the most common phrase uttered in my home. And while that's now impossible for a couple of reasons (RIP Pandora), there's a good reason the Echo became the go-to music hub of my home.

With the Australian Launch of Echo in a few weeks time, here's what the plans are for Aussie listeners.

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"Thanks, Alexa"

"No worries"

Even though she hasn't officially launched on our shores, by now you'd be familiar with Amazon Echo - the nifty little smart home gadget that can play your favourite music, settle arguments over which actor was in that movie you're thinking of, set timers for your cooking, and basically ensure you never touch a light switch again - just by asking her.

While there are ways to get her in the country, what we've really been waiting for is Amazon to release the Echo range in Australia - officially. Well, folks - do I have some news for you. You can pre-order from today.

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Do you remember back in the '90s, when high-definition TVs first started to become popular? Seeing that HD for the first time, the sharpness seemed almost impossible compared to existing technology. But this year, several top tech companies showed off 8K screens with 16-times as many pixels as those old 1080p HD TVs. For me, seeing these new super sharp TVs at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) felt like the first time all over again.

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It doesn't look special. At a glance, it's just a Razer gaming mouse sitting on a Razer gaming pad - which means everything is black except for some bright, colourful lights. But then you pick the mouse up and it's way too light to be wireless. After ten seconds the cursor on screen flickers and the lights on the mouse turn off. It's disconnected because this mouse, the Razer Mamba Hyperflux, powers itself entirely from the mousepad. There's no battery in the thing at all.

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Looking ahead to 2018, there's plenty to be excited about when it comes to design. From technology companies who are finally starting to own their responsibility, to the rest of us saying goodbye to boring hardware - here are five design trends we'd like to see more of this year.

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Every major VR player has made the same promise. A VR headset that would be completely wireless. One that would let you go anywhere without tripping over cords or being tethered to a computer/phone/PS4. Google, which has spent more than a year quietly improving its VR platform, Daydream, is now the first company to cross the standalone finish line. The Daydream-powered Lenovo Mirage Solo is a beauty.

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After covering CES for 10 years, nothing I've seen at the show has me as excited about the future as Ossia's wireless charging technology. The company's developed a way to deliver power to your gadgets the same way internet is delivered by wi-fi, and one of the first real-world applications of the tech is a AA battery that may never need replacing.