Computing

If you experience inappropriate behaviour in the workplace, you have a number of different avenues you can consider. You can report the incident to human resources, hire an attorney, or, now, tell an unblinking machine. Spot, an AI-powered, browser-based chatbot for reporting workplace misconduct, launched out of beta this month in order to, as its website states, let people "report workplace harassment and discrimination without talking to a human."

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

In the past few weeks, the entire information security industry has grown very anxious about Meltdown and Spectre, two classes of exploits that can be used to manipulate vulnerabilities in the way many varieties of modern processors (but especially Intel ones) handle a performance-improving technique called speculative execution and extract hidden system data. While numerous platforms have rushed to roll out patches, and Meltdown appears to be less of an issue than Spectre, it's still unclear just how badly this situation could go.

There's a long list of things wrong with the Justice League movie, not the least of which being the hasty and poorly-executed digital removal of Henry Cavill's moustache that he couldn't shave during the film's reshoots. But not to worry, some random dude on the internet with a $500 used PC and a world-changing AI just fixed at least one part of that film.

Lauri Love, a 32-year-old British computer hacker wanted by the FBI, will not be extradited to the United States. The ruling came down today after Love's attorneys argued that he suffered from depression and was at risk of dying by suicide if he were placed in solitary confinement in the US, a disciplinary tactic seen by most of the developed world as torture.

Shared from The Conversation

The disclosure of the Meltdown and Spectre computer vulnerabilities on January 2, 2018 was in many ways unprecedented. It shocked – and scared – even the experts.

The vulnerabilities bypass traditional security measures in the computer and affect billions of devices, from mobile phones to massive cloud servers.

We have, unfortunately, grown used to attacks on computer systems that exploit the inevitable flaws resulting from vast conceptual complexity. Our computer systems are the most complex artefacts humans have ever built, and the growth of complexity has far outstripped our ability to manage it.

Qubits are the "building blocks" of quantum computers. They are also highly unstable - and that means lots of errors.

Enter Australian Scientists: who are smashing it on every level when it comes to quantum computing advancements. Of course, they have found a "quantum hack" - a way to modify qubit surface codes, improving quantum error correction by up to four hundred per cent.

In the wake of Spectre and Meltdown, every major computing company is scrambling to try to find a way to fix, or at least address, the widespread security vulnerabilities at hand. And while things haven't been going great over in the Microsoft camp after the company had to pull its latest security patch, today Google is trying to shore up systems running Chrome OS with a new update, version 64.

"AI is one of the most important things humanity is working on. It is more profound than, I dunno, electricity or fire." Those words were not uttered from the lips of a stoned Gizmodo staffer but said on a stage at a Recode- and NBC-sponsored "town hall" in San Francisco last month by Google CEO Sundar Pichai.