Cameras

1

Polaroid went bust in 2001, and the company formed from its ashes went bust again in 2008. The Polaroid Corporation that formed from that has had a shaky history, releasing digital 'instant' cameras and instant photo printers. But on the 80th anniversary of the original company's founding, Polaroid is back as Polaroid Originals — and it's making a new instant film camera called the OneStep 2.

0

Canon and Nikon have a tendency to dominate the news with lenses and bodies. Fujifilm wants to capture your attention with something different — software. And cool software at that. Starting from November this year, select Fujifilm cameras, in combination with a special desktop application, will be able to convert RAW images using the camera's internal hardware.

5

Professional drone racing is a sport in its infancy. But that's exciting — it's like F1 without the rules. Companies like Red Bull are throwing cash at flashy championships on crazy tracks. We asked a pro racer exactly how to get into the sport and what it's like.

0

Interchangeable lens shooters such as the Sony A9 are evidence that mirrorless cameras can not only compete at the highest levels of photography, but they're probably also the eventual successors to DSLRs. So you'd assume that a company like Canon would have made strong inroads into the mirrorless market by now. But with cameras like the new EOS M100, the company is still treating the mirrorless market as an afterthought, not the future.

1

Few have the disposable income to casually drop $9000 on a camera like Nikon's D5. NASA, of course, has a couple of spare pennies to toss around on purchases such as this. And when NASA buys cameras, it buys cameras. 53 to be exact. Yes, the US space organisation has just unloaded close to half-a-million bucks on Nikon's DSLRs.

2

Days after a Baltimore cop was suspended for unwittingly filming himself apparently planting evidence, the Baltimore Public Defender's Office has announced that they have uncovered a second video, with a different group of cops, which also "appears to depict multiple officers working together to manufacture evidence". Additionally, prosecutors announced on Friday that they will drop felony drug and guns charges in 34 cases linked to testimony from the three officers in the original video. As many as 77 cases are still being reviewed.