Cameras

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The internet has made it supremely easy to install connected security cameras wherever you want. Unfortunately for Nest, that easy connectivity makes it simple for hackers to disable its cameras with just a few keystrokes. And that's a very bad feature for a security camera.

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Time and time again, police officers shoot, and sometimes kill, civilians holding harmless objects, later claiming they mistook them for guns: A mobile phone, a bible, and a Wii controller. In early February, police body camera manufacturer Taser announced that it had acquired the artificial intelligence startup Dextro Inc — a "computer vision" research team that claims it can use object recognition software to train officers to better discern actual threats. But privacy experts find the surveillance and profiling possibilities offered by this latest, but certainly not last, upgrade to police body cameras unsettling. Moreover, the question remains: The cameras may be getting smarter, but are they actually making the public safer?

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At this year's Australian Open tennis, photography agency Getty Images captured thousands of images every day, using high-end digital SLRs that produce massive digital files. And speed — the speed of getting those high-res, high quality photos out to the world, on news websites and social media — is key. The biggest change in delivering them, says Getty, is Wi-Fi: the wireless camera transfer tech that started out in much cheaper cameras built for hobbyists and travelers.

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Thousands of nearly invisible sweat pores live amongst the spiraling ridges on your fingertips. They only reveal themselves if you're patient enough to wait for them to start working. Luckily, the good folks of YouTube's Timelapse Vision Inc. channel were kind enough to create footage of sweating fingerprints that look like a car crash: you don't want to look at it, but once you do, it's impossible to look away.