Aussie Tesla Prices Have Had a Not-so-S 3 X Y Increase

Aussie Tesla Prices Have Had a Not-so-S 3 X Y Increase
Image: Tesla

The Australian prices of the Tesla Model 3 and the upcoming Tesla Model Y have risen over the weekend.

As spotted by Drive, the Model 3 and the Model Y, the first of which was subject to a price increase already this year, have risen steadily in price. This is in line with price increases in the U.S. last week.

The Tesla Model 3 now starts at $65,500 (was 63,900, and $60,900 before that price rise), whereas the Model Y now starts at $72,300 (was $68,900). All configurations of the Model 3 and the Model Y are subject to this price rise.

We’ve got detailed information about every Tesla model below.

Every Tesla available in Australia

By far the most successful electric car company and led by “Technoking” (yes, that’s what Tesla calls its CEO) Elon Musk, We’re likely to see the Tesla name for years to come.

With several new vehicles on the way, including the very memeable Tesla Cybertruck (which might not pass ADR), we’ve put together an article on every Tesla you can currently buy in Australia.

Tesla currently offers four vehicles in Australia – the Model S, the Model 3, the Model X and the Model Y. These are all available at separate price points and, fun fact, spell out S3XY (this blew my mind when I first realised it). Let’s go through them.

The Tesla Model S

The Tesla Model S sedan is the flagship (flag car?) of the Tesla range, capable of reaching 100 km/h in 3.2 seconds with a max expected range of 652 kilometres.

The Tesla Model S costs $147,990 in Australia (before additional costs), although the Tesla Model S Plaid edition costs $186,990 (this comes with higher specs, including zero to 100km/h in 2.1 seconds, but a lower range of 632 kilometres). If you’ve got the money to burn and want an electric vehicle with high performance, the Tesla Model S is your answer.

These prices are accurate as of the last time we checked, however glancing over the Tesla website now, it would appear that pricing information for the Model S is no longer available. We’ve reached out to Tesla for clarification.

every tesla australia
Image: Tesla

The Tesla Model 3

The Tesla Model 3 is the cheapest Tesla available in Australia at the moment. Starting at $65,500 for the Standard Range Plus model (before additional costs), the Tesla Model 3 is capable of reaching 100 km/h in 6.1 seconds, with a maximum range of 491 kilometres. The Long Range model is capable of zero to 100 km/h in 4.4 seconds with a maximum range of 614 kilometres, whereas the Performance model is capable of zero to 100 km/h in 3.3 seconds, with a maximum range of 567 kilometres.

The Tesla Model 3 starts at $65,500, whereas the Tesla Model 3 Long Range costs $80,000 and the Tesla Model 3 Performance costs $91,600.

every tesla australia
Image: Tesla

The Tesla Model X

An SUV with falcon-wing doors for the backseats, the Tesla Model X is the biggest Tesla in the range, perfect for families and anyone who typically carries a lot in their car. The Model X is capable of 560 kilometres on a single charge and can reach 100 km/h in 3.9 seconds. The Tesla Model X Plaid version can travel 536 kilometres without needing a recharge and gets to 100 km/h in 2.6 seconds.

The Model X starts at $165,990 (before additional costs) whereas the Model X Plaid starts at $174,990.

These prices are accurate as of the last time we checked, however glancing over the Tesla website now, it would appear that pricing information for the Model X is no longer available. We’ve reached out to Tesla for clarification.

every tesla australia
Image: Tesla

The Tesla Model Y

The Tesla Model Y is now available for order in Australia in two configurations. The Tesla Model Y starts at $72,300 for the RWD model and $96,700 for the AWD model.

The RWD model is capable of about 455km range and zero to 100km/h in 6.9 seconds, whereas the AWD model is capable of about 514km range and zero to 100km/h in 3.7 seconds.

Deliveries are expected for February 2023 to May 2023 if you order today.

every tesla australia
The Tesla Model Y. Image: Tesla

Should I buy a new Tesla in Australia?

If you want the feeling of a new car, don’t let anything stop you from purchasing a new Tesla. That being said, just be aware that you could end up waiting weeks or months for your car to arrive. Though suspected to be lower quality, a new car goes a long way.

Currently, due to chip shortages and supply constraints, it’s actually more expensive to get a second-hand Tesla than it is to get a new Tesla – just so you’re able to have it here and now. For that reason, we encourage you to be cautious and pay attention to potential dodgy deals.

What incentives are available to me if I want to buy a Tesla?

Good question! Some Australian states and territories (in particular NSW, Queensland, Western Australia, Victoria and the ACT) offer incentive programs if you want to buy a new electric vehicle. Incentives and programs vary from state to state, so it’s best to read up on what is available to you before making a purchase.

What are some Tesla Model 3 alternatives?

Although the Tesla Model 3 offers one of the best cost-to-range electric vehicles in Australia, don’t think that there aren’t other options. The Polestar 2, which we reviewed, is worth considering, as is the MG ES EV, which is currently the cheapest electric car in the country (if cost is your biggest concern, but be aware of its shorter range).

What other Tesla cars are coming to Australia?

While we don’t know yet if the Tesla Cybertruck will come to Australia or not, early Tesla Model Y orders are on the way later this year (initial orders were scheduled for between August and November, although the delivery window for new orders has been pushed back into early 2023). For now, the Model S, the Model 3 and the Model X are all that are available in the country.

The new Tesla Roadster is also planned for Australia (or you can pick up a second-hand original model) but we’ll wait for more solid news on that, considering it isn’t available anywhere in the world just yet.

This article has been updated since it was first published.