Crazy Yellow Ants Get Another $3 Million In The Budget

Crazy Yellow Ants Get Another $3 Million In The Budget

If you were concerned that no ants would appear in the 2021 Federal Budget, we have some good news for you. Crazy Yellow Ants are getting another $3 million.

Well, $3 million is going towards their eradication, to be precise.

Crazy Yellow Ants are back

Ants and the Budget is nothing new. The last few financial years have seen millions of Federal dollars dedicated to pest control of Red Fire Ants and Crazy Yellow Ants.

And 2021-2022 will be no different.

According to Budget Paper 3, more money is being thrown at the ants in Queensland.

“The Australian Government will provide funding to ensure a more concerted approach to yellow crazy ant control activities in and adjacent to the Wet Tropics of Queensland World Heritage Area,” the Budget reads.

While $3 million was also handed down last year, this is about a third of what was put towards the control of Crazy Yellow Ants in the 2019-2020 Budget, which was $9.2 million.

What’s the problem with these ants?

Crazy Yellow Ants, or Anoplolepis gracilipes, are one of the world’s top 100 most invasive species.

According to the Department of Primary Industry:

“Yellow crazy ants are highly invasive and can build super colonies and devastate local flora and fauna and impact on agricultural production and the horticultural industry. Yellow crazy ants, although not a direct threat to humans, are serious and classified as a prohibited matter event under the Biosecurity Act 2015 as they are a serious environmental pest which pose a risk to our economy, environment and communities.”

Interestingly, they were first discovered in Queensland in 2001. They spread from Cairns and now millions in Budget dollars are put towards trying to get rid of them every year.
But it seems that ants aren’t getting as much of an intense focus as a couple of years back. In the 2019 – 2020 Budget $1.3 million was also put towards the eradicating of the Argentine Ant plaguing Norfolk Island.
A further $18.3 million was put towards red fire ants that were messing up newly defined areas and can cause anaphylactic reactions and death.