Baby TikTok Witches Are Apparently Trying to Hex the Moon

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Image: The WB

Drama appears in all corners of the world and even WitchTok — a witch subculture on TikTok — has not been left untouched.

A self-described witch on Twitter has warned that a group of ‘baby witches’ on WitchTok is going around casting hexes — bad spells — all over the place with reckless abandon. Specifically, these ‘inexperienced’ witches are targeting the moon and mythical fairy-like creatures from European folklore, called the fae.

Sure, it’s a little niche but as far as online drama goes, this one’s a rabbit hole. Let’s jump in.

How did this WitchTok drama start?

WitchTok is a mixed bag of content with a loose theme — general witchy vibes. There are supposed spells and manifestations and while some videos can be a little scary, there’s a lot of positive and wholesome content. Then there are the sub-groups at the core of this story — the baby witches.

According to a tweet by Twitter user Jupiter, a group of these witches is casting hexes against the moon and the fae. The moon, Jupiter explained, is a source of energy and ‘fuel’ for spells. This hex is also supposedly affecting the gods of the moon and sun, Artemis and Apollo. So, hurting the moon is like spiking your own water source — it’s a silly thing to do in the world of witchcraft.

Ultimately, however, Jupiter says the moon won’t really be harmed, just the witches who claim to depend on it. And it’s the fae you’ve got to watch out for.

You’ve likely seen a fairy in many childhood movies. They’re usually good, sweet and innocent but like many things in Hollywood, the on-screen depiction is quite distant from the true folklore. The fae of European, particularly Irish, folklore are menaces. According to the legends, the fae follow their own set of rules and are often referenced as being mischievous at best and destructive and deadly at worst.

So, like hexing the moon, it’s a big no-no to hex the fae in the witching world.

A recent update on July 20 suggests that the unnamed ‘baby witches’ weren’t behind the moon’s hexing after all and that the group is more experienced than previously suspected. The supposed hexer is allegedly not responsible for the fae hexing.

The plot thickens.

It should be noted while Jupiter and other self-described witches on Twitter, Reddit and TikTok have described this group of hex-cursing witches, it’s not clear what videos or evidence they’re referencing.

What else does WitchTok do aside from hexing the moon and the fae?

As we mentioned, WitchTok is mostly filled with how-to spell videos, jokes about being witches and other things of a witchy nature. It can also be used for social justice causes, like the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement.

Back in June, during the height of the U.S. BLM demonstrations, the witches began to mobilise on the app under the #witchesforblm tag.

That tag has now amassed 31.8 million views on TikTok and is filled with videos calling on witches to cast protection spells for Black lives as well as anyone involved in protesting.

TikTok isn’t the only place the witches of the internet congregate for a joint cause.

Back in 2017, Lana del Rey also announced she was joining an online movement of witches working together to cast a hex on U.S. President Donald Trump. The movement, at the time, was mostly orchestrated through Tumblr back when that was thing (R.I.P.).

It’s not clear whether the hex worked seeing as Trump is still the president despite a number of political scandals, but the sentiment was there.

If you take nothing else from this saga, heed Jupiter’s simple message — leave the moon out of your hexes, please.