Facebook Quietly Changed Its Tagline And Nobody Knows Why

Image: Getty Images

In the early days of Facebook, numerous viral posts alleged Facebook would soon start charging users for an account on the social media site.

Facebook then included a new tag on its login page: "It's free and always will be." But recently, Facebook quietly switched out the tagline for "it's quick and easy" and no one knows why.

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Facebook has maintained it's free and "always will be" on its login page for a nearly a decade but by around August 7, it had been swapped out for another tagline, as reported by Business Insider.

Image: Facebook

The slogan was first introduced in December 2008, according to web-archiving system Wayback Machine, replacing the previous "it's free and anyone can join."

Prior to that there was no mention of free on the login page.

Image: Wayback Machine

Gizmodo Australia has reached out to Facebook Australia for clarification regarding the tagline change.

While it's unlikely Facebook would start charging users to use the service, it's speculated that the change comes after an increase in public awareness that while you're not forced to pay actual money for Facebook, you hand over much of your data.

The data you surrender as a willing participant is how Facebook makes its fortune. With the help of big data, Facebook is able to sell targeted advertising, which is why you often see products pop up on Facebook from your recent searches.

Business Insider's report points out in Facebook's Platform Policy, it notes in Section 7(11) it doesn't "guarantee that Platform will always be free."

Facebook has yet to provide a comment on the change.

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[Business Insider]

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