Tagged With zork

Shared from Kotaku

When I think about retro games, forget Mario, Sonic or even Tetris. I think Zork. The quirky text adventure, published by Personal Software (and then Infocom) back in 1980, screwed with players in many, many ways (when it wasn't sending grues after them). I thought I knew its best secrets -- that is until prominent developer Ryan C. Gordon‏ revealed the granddaddy of them all... and the most underhanded use of randomness I've seen in a game for a while.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Shared from Kotaku

When I think about retro games, forget Mario, Sonic or even Tetris. I think Zork. The quirky text adventure, published by Personal Software (and then Infocom) back in 1980, screwed with players in many, many ways (when it wasn't sending grues after them). I thought I knew its best secrets -- that is until prominent developer Ryan C. Gordon‏ revealed the granddaddy of them all... and the most underhanded use of randomness I've seen in a game for a while.