Tagged With xpost

Shared from Lifehacker

As the NBN rollout slowly lurches on, data communications over cellular networks continue to bound along, seemingly overtaking the capability of the network that should be the centrepiece of our country's communications infrastructure. And there are plenty of people out there suggesting we won't need the NBN once 5G is widely deployed. But that's not quite how it will be.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Shared from Theconversation

We have all heard the dire predictions about robots coming to steal our jobs. Some would even have us believe these silicon bogeymen are coming to kill us. It plays straight into people’s darkest fears about technology.

When futurists talk about things that haven’t happened yet, they are free to parade educated guesses as fact. But before we take their word for it, we might remember the old adage:

… in God we trust, all others bring data.

Shared from Lifehacker

Mobile Broadband was once something used by road warriors and students; people who spent long stretches of their day away from a reliable WiFi network. And it still is, but more and more people are now turning to a mobile data connection for everyday internet as well.

It's a good time to take a look, too. While you wouldn't describe mobile data prices as cheap, especially compared to fixed line internet prices, the prices are certainly more affordable now, and the plans come with much more data than before. Here are some hand-picked options to consider.

Shared from Lifehacker

JB Hi-Fi has released its half-year earnings report for 2018 and once again, the Blu-ray and DVD categories have taken a big hit. Software sales (which includes music, movies and video games) fell by 6.5 per cent compared to the first half of FY2017. This was despite a healthy rise in profits for the Games category.

In other words, JB's movie sales are declining at an even faster rate than the above figure suggests. The act of physically placing a disc into a Blu-ray player could soon be as outmoded as VHS tape. Blame Netflix.

Shared from Kotaku

I bet you own a few cords. You might have so many cords that they burst out behind your TV stand or below your desk. Play video games for any length of time and you'll acquire all sorts of cords you don't know what to do with. For just a few bucks you can rein that mess in though and make some sense of the cyberpunk sprawl lurking behind your TV or monitor.

Shared from Lifehacker

Telstra and Optus announced this week that both would launch 5G services next year, and the general response was "sure, but it's not like they're going to give us a lot of data, so who cares?"

Will this be the case? I'm not so sure. One of the key benefits of 5G technology is a big increase in network capacity, so I'm quietly optimistic about how this will play out.

Shared from Theconversation

The race to market for widespread driverless cars may be on, but that doesn’t mean we’re anywhere near a deployable reality. Much of the initial hype has settled down, and the claims made by manufacturers and startups with regards to timelines have moderated.

As the key stakeholders - the automotive industry, government and the public - consider the impacts of a possible driverless car future, their implications in the Australian landscape are starting to become clearer.

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Our secrets, sometimes quite intimate, have increasingly been pilfered and exposed by hackers. So what's to stop them from going a step further and killing us using the technology we rely on?

While it might sound far-fetched, it's certainly possible.

Shared from Kotaku

A couple of days ago, a Twitter bot posted a screenshot from a video game called "StarTribes: Myth of the Dragon Lord". Except, no such game exists. It took some digging from Amberle, an eagle-eyed follower of the bot, to track down the image's likely origin: 1992's Laser Lords. The problem is, the contents of the screenshot never appeared in the final game.

Shared from Lifehacker

Last year, Samsung introduced an innovative new product to the TV buying public dubbed 'The Frame'. These Yves Behar-designed models attempt to make TV panels feel less like technology and more like art. Boasting a minimalist construction and ultra-thin bezels, each unit resembles a jumbo picture frame.

Originally only available in 55-inch and 65-inch iterations, you can now snap up a 43-inch model which is better suited for the bedroom (and kinder to your wallet). Here are the details.

Shared from Lifehacker

For the past year, Google has been pumping out lightweight versions of its most popular apps designed specifically for low-cost smartphones. Under the Android Go banner, we've already seen YouTube Go, Google Maps Go, and even a brand new service called Files Go meant to clear up storage space on your device. Now Google is rolling out its latest lightweight app: Assistant Go.

Shared from The Sydney Morning Herald

A self-confessed computer hacker accused of illegally accessing the customer database of car-share company GoGet had previously advised the company on flaws in its software system that could make it vulnerable to cyber attack, a court has heard.

Nik Cubrilovic, 37, from Penrose in the Southern Highlands, was the holder of a legitimate GoGet account in mid-2016 when he sent the online company a series of emails advising them he had identified vulnerabilities in their operating systems.

Shared from The Conversation

The disclosure of the Meltdown and Spectre computer vulnerabilities on January 2, 2018 was in many ways unprecedented. It shocked – and scared – even the experts.

The vulnerabilities bypass traditional security measures in the computer and affect billions of devices, from mobile phones to massive cloud servers.

We have, unfortunately, grown used to attacks on computer systems that exploit the inevitable flaws resulting from vast conceptual complexity. Our computer systems are the most complex artefacts humans have ever built, and the growth of complexity has far outstripped our ability to manage it.