Tagged With wear os

If you carry around an iPhone as your smartphone of choice then the Apple Watch is hands-down the best option for a smartwatch, for the seamless integration if nothing else. But what about the rest of us? You've got more options than you might realise for a companion wearable, and we're going to get into the pros and cons of each.

When Google changed the name of its smartwatch OS from Android Wear to Wear OS, I was pissed. Not because the name sucked, as Wear OS does do a better job of reflecting the platform's support for both Android and iOS devices. The problem was that the rebranding didn't come with any new features or updates that advanced the capabilities of the platform. That meant the name change was more symbolic than anything, or at the very least, poorly timed.

Is it going to be called Pumpkin Pie or Peppermint Patty? Or how about Popsicle? Well, whatever Google ends up deciding on, if history is any indication, we're not going to know for sure until spring. So to hold us over, why don't we take a look at all the new updates and features Google showed off for Android at I/O 2018?

Video: Google I/O, the company's annual developer conference, kicks off today with a keynote at 3AM AEST led by Google CEO Sundar Pichai, who will no doubt wax about the major projects Google's been working on since its last conference. Are you ready for extremely nerdy details about Android P? It's a bit too late to hop on a plane and grab a seat at the event, but fortunately, you can enjoy it from the comfort of your chair.

Google's big once-a-year developer conference kicks off Tuesday May 8 (Wednesday May 9 in Australia). While much of Google I/O is meant to support coders and the people who create apps and software for Google's various platforms, what gets announced at the event will impact anyone who uses Android, Chrome OS, Wear OS, or any of Google's many first-party apps - so basically everyone. Here are the big announcements we're expecting to see (and a few things we won't) at Google I/O 2018.

Yesterday, Google announced it would rename its four-year-old smartwatch operating system from Android Wear to Wear OS. Ostensibly, the purpose of this rebranding is to prevent scaring off iPhone owners from purchasing smartwatches running Android Wear, which for a long time has supported pairing with both Android and iOS devices. As Google puts it, Wear OS is "a wearables operating system for everyone".