Tagged With watches

One of the most interesting gadgets I've tested in the past few years was the Matrix PowerWatch: a fitness-tracking timepiece powered only by the wearer's body heat. The battery-free technology was neat, but the watch's limited functionality wasn't. Matrix Industries' new PowerWatch X promises to be a more useful and capable wearable, but even with infinite battery life, it still falls short of being a useful smartwatch.

There's no better example of the war between form and function than smartwatch design. There are boxy, bulging, touchscreen wearables that do almost everything your smartphone can, and there are sleeker analogue alternatives that maybe keep track of how many calories you've burned. With the latest version of the Vívomove HR, Garmin has tried, and mostly succeeded, in balancing both approaches, creating a smartwatch that hides a respectable list of features behind a traditional analogue face.

The original Game Boy was the first device to push my fascination with gadgets to an obsession. I saved for months to buy one, and to this day it's still one of my favourite gaming platforms. That explains why, despite every gadget I use having an alarm clock built-in, I now prefer waking up to this adorable Game Boy alarm clock and watch that each play the Super Mario Land theme.

What if, instead of frantically trying to find a power outlet when your smartphone is about to die, you simply had to hold it in your hand and scroll through Instagram for a while? That's the future the Matrix PowerWatch teases, because it's able to charge itself using nothing but the warmth of your body. Unfortunately there's a bit of a trade off I've noticed in my limited use, and infinite power comes with the need for some exceptional vision.

Welcome back to Toy Aisle, our weekly round up of all the fabulous new toys just waiting to drain our wallets of their precious monetary fluids. This week, Hot Toys tackles The Last Jedi's most important characters, plus a patriotically posable Captain America, and even stranger Stranger Things board games.

Despite attempts by companies like Apple and Fossil to improve their looks, no one really wears a smartwatch as a fashion accessory. Devotees of connected timepieces wear them as either a genuine devotion to fitness, or an unhealthy addiction to notifications. But Garmin's new vívomove HR looks like like a classic analogue watch, and only reveals its smarts when you want it to.

The Huawei Watch 2 is the first smartwatch in Australia that supports 4G, and that's just one of its many tricks. Running Android Wear, it's simple but powerful. This is the first watch you can use properly without your phone in Australia -- and that comes in handy more often than you'd think.

The thumbwheel was the signature feature of BlackBerry's original handsets, and while touchscreens have made them mostly obsolete, the Apple Watch proves there's still a place for physical dials. But is Apple finally planning to introduce that rotating crown to the iPhone or iPad? A recently published patent suggests that the company might be considering it.

Despite the name, smartwatches can be kind of dumb. Sure, they can do cool things, like control your music and put notifications on your wrist. But battery life woes and underwhelming platforms leave you questioning the real IQ of these supposedly "smart" devices. However, there is a road less travelled: an area unexplored by big tech giants, where people can revel in functioning wristputers without being stuck in a technological mire.

There are a lot of good reasons to believe this watch that uses flowing liquid mercury to show the time is fake. A low-quality video, a questionable website and product shots that look like photocopies of photocopies. But that doesn't stop us from wanting a watch that looks like the T-1000 strapped to your wrist.

Video: A watch strap is just a strip of leather, right? Nope! Not when it's handcrafted like this. There are so many steps involved in the process of making a leather watch strap that it borders on ridiculous. From selecting the leather to stamping out the strap to shaving down the interior to dyeing the material to carving out the holes, the details are intense but a pleasure to watch.