Tagged With vacuum cleaners

This thing sucks. In a good way. The Samsung VR9300 is the most powerful robot vacuum cleaner that you can buy in Australia, and it's redesigned to be slimmer in profile than its predecessors to better slip underneath your couch and furniture to keep your house clean. Integrated Wi-Fi and a ceiling-mapping camera and onboard sensor suite means it'll guide itself around your property while you're away, and you can remotely control it to give your house a bit of a tszuj while you're out.

If you looked at buying a new cordless vacuum any time in the last couple of years, chances are you considered Dyson's V6 handstick -- a gadget that we absolutely love, and regularly use, for keeping small apartments and living spaces clean without the hassle of a power cord. A few months after launching the same model internationally, the brand new Dyson V8 has hit Australia, and it makes some pretty damn useful improvements on an already good design.

Dyson makes good vacuum cleaners. Dyson makes complicated vacuum cleaners, but all that complex engineering work doesn't really matter to the customer that buys one. At the end of the day, it's just a vacuum cleaner, and it just has to do the vacuuming. Being complex also means being simple, really.

To demonstrate this, Dyson and Gizmodo teamed up to take a new Dyson Cinetic Big Ball apart, and then put it back together. To be specific, Dyson did the taking apart bit, and I tried the putting back together bit.

Dyson has a new vacuum, and it's the British company's most advanced yet -- but in ways that you might not expect. The new Cinetic Big Ball won't lose suction or clog up with dust or hair thanks to its incredibly well engineered Cinetic oscillating tips, but a vacuum isn't exactly useful if you can't move it around with you. The new Big Ball is smaller, cheaper and sleeker than the old model, and always cleans the dust bin out on the first go, but anyone that's dragged a big vacuum around a house behind them will love this bit: it just can't tip over.

Robot vacuum cleaners are great, in theory. That most menial of household chores is perfectly suited to a mindless automaton, cleaning up your leavings while you're out and having fun. But they usually aren't especially good. Until now, we would have only recommended Samsung's POWERbot. Miele, the brand of choice for proper vacuum cleaners, now has a robot in its arsenal.

Unless you live in a retro-futuristic curvaceous bubble home, your house is probably filled with corners full of dust and debris and your boxy or round robotic vacuum can't quite reach them. It makes you wonder why all robot vacuums aren't designed like Panasonic's new MC-RS1 Rulo with its triangular-shaped form factor that allow its spinning bristles to reach and clean deep into corners.

As cool as robotic vacuum cleaners can be, they're not usually particularly good at actually vacuuming. Weedy vacuum motors and ineffective sensors often make for autonomous cleaners that don't really do a very good job. We're finally reaching the stage, though, where manufacturers are building in large enough batteries, powerful enough motors and smart enough software to make robots a viable alternative to the old fashioned upright and canister models pushed around by fleshy meatbag humans. Enter the POWERbot VR9000 -- Samsung has finally made a robot vacuum that doesn't suck.

Your bed is filthy. Your floor is filthy, too, but it's your mattress that's the big problem. Did you know that you're meant to vacuum your mattress regularly? I didn't. Dyson is (probably) the only appliance manufacturer in Europe with its own microbiology lab, and it has a pop-up in Sydney's Circular Quay to show you the nasties lurking in your house.

On Reddit, there's a sub-section called Buy It For Life -- it's filled with posts about belts, boots, hair clippers and other ephemera made to last a lifetime. One topic that seems to pop up more often than others is vacuum cleaners, and whenever that topic is discussed, the Miele brand seems to get mentioned more than you'd expect.

Where as Roomba -- arguably the most popular robot vacuum on the market -- uses a tried and true pre-programmed algorithm to randomly explore and clean the floors in your home. Neato's robotic vacuums -- including its new BotVac -- use a built-in laser scanner to map a room and plan out the most efficient cleaning route.

Did you know the polycarbonate plastic material that Dyson uses for the dirt collecting bins on its vacuums is the same material used to make police riot shields? We all know that Dyson makes some of the best vacuums on the market, but the company is now giving us an inside look at its R&D labs and exactly how it ensures its hardware sucks so incredibly well.

Not content with making every other vacuum and fan on the market seem like a cheap children's toy, Dyson has now set its sights on the floor mop that's been quivering in your broom closet, awaiting its day of reckoning. The unfortunately named Dyson Hard is a version of the company's handheld cordless vacs that sees the business end replaced with a cleaning head that also sucks away dirt before it scrubs your floors.

Besides being waterboarded and kept awake for 180 hours, there's not an awful lot to do when you're in the custody of the CIA for orchestrating the biggest terrorist attack in American history. So after he spilled all the secrets he could spill, 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheik Mohammed did what anyone in his position would do to pass the time. He designed a vacuum cleaner

Falling somewhere between a compact Dustbuster and a full-sized floor vacuum, LG's new VH9200DS is specifically designed to rid your bed and sheets of all the tiny critters hoping to spend the night with you. But it can also handle dust and crumbs, so you never need to feel bad about snacking in bed.

Robot vacuum cleaners a great little gizmos... until they need to charge themselves. True, they're intelligent enough these days to head to their charging station, but wouldn't be awesome if it could use the bacteria it sucks up as an energy source? Yes, now that sounds like the future.


Suction power has become an important bullet point when it comes to selling vacuums. But what really matters to consumers is how easy they are to empty. The annoying bags of yesteryear have been replaced with easy to use trapdoor canisters, which now see further improvement with Electrolux's new UltraCaptic cleaners that compress the dust into an easily disposable disc.

Dads of the world, take note: you don't have to leave the hairstyling to mum. Got a vacuum? Great. Got one of those snakey tube attachments? Perfect. Pop a rubber band on that bad boy, suck your daughter's hair up in the tube, and voilà! A perfect ponytail. Cue touchdown dance.