Tagged With usb 3.0

The new USB C standard is awesome. It doesn’t matter which way you plug it in, it's tough, it's fast and it’s going to become the new default connector. So where the heck is it? These are the devices that have it available right now.

Just about the worst thing is being stuck on an airplane without easy access to your favourite downloaded videos due to a flat battery on your laptop. Sandisk's latest dual USB drive lets you load it up with TV shows, movies or other media to watch indiscriminately on your laptop or tablet or smartphone, and it does so faster than ever.

Need massive yet fast storage that you can slip in a pocket? Samsung has just launched an external SSD using their new 3D V-NAND, but how much will it set you back here in Australia?

For every 10 steps forward that Apple's designers make in terms of improved usability for the company's products, they still always manage to take a couple of steps back. The world may never fully know why the USB ports are hidden away out-of-reach on the back of an iMac, but companies like Satechi are working hard to remedy that problem with products like this front-facing clamp-on hub.

There aren't too many reasons you'd buy a high-end USB 3.0 flash drive. Maybe you are a design or graphics professional, transferring hundreds of files on a regular basis where time is money. It could be that you need a combination of incredibly fast flash memory and capacious storage in one drive. Perhaps you just have too much money to spend on fancy PC peripherals. The Lexar JumpDrive P10, available in capacities up to a ridiculous 128GB, is even faster than the Sandisk Extreme Pro.

If you're buying a portable hard drive, chances are you're looking for extra storage space for your desktop PC or laptop. It makes sense to find a drive with the maximum capacity possible, without trading off too much portability. The Seagate Backup Plus FAST boasts 4TB of storage, but runs off a single USB 3.0 cable -- no extra power required.

It's a great time to be a travelling photographer or video editor -- portable hard drives are the fastest and most capacious they have ever been, and will only continue to get faster. Seagate's new Backup Plus FAST, just released in Australia, squeezes two thin laptop hard drives into a compact aluminium case, hooks them up with high-speed RAID 0, and runs the whole deal off the power of a single USB port.

USB drives are not particularly interesting. They're small, boring, fragile. If you can manage to hang on to one for more than a few weeks, if you don't accidentally drop it or crush it, you'll probably throw it out the window in anger after waiting for large file transfers to finish. As corny as it sounds, Sandisk's Extreme PRO USB 3.0 changes all of that.

Thunderbolt has arrived on the PC after being exclusive to the Macintosh platform for more than a year. With its promise of 10Gb/s‑per‑channel throughput, what self-respecting power user wouldn't opt for a Thunderbolt-based external backup solution? Well, before you get too excited, let's compare T-bolt point-by-point with its natural competitor, USB 3.0. After all, there's more to a technology than pure performance, as we found out.

You may've noticed there are many laptops and PCs out there that support USB 3.0 now, but unfortunately both AMD and Intel haven't added support for the latest version in their chipsets before. This is set to change with AMD's A75 and A70M chipsets, which will be the first to be branded "Superspeed USB". Previously, PC builders have had to use third-party controllers if they wanted to include the much-faster USB 3.0.

At first glance you wonder if this USB key needs to go on a diet. Like something from ten years ago, it seems much bigger than it needs to be. Oh, but then you find it's packing 120GB in there, and will dump it all at a rate of 260MB/s. Suddenly it's not a big USB key, it's a tiny external SSD.