Tagged With unrollme

For years now, people have been letting Unroll.me read the contents of their email inboxes, to help them unsubscribe from email spam. The service was endorsed by our sister site Lifehacker in 2011 for its effectiveness in finding and cleaning out unwanted subscriptions (and Gizmodo wrote about its iOS app release last year).

But a New York Times profile of Uber this weekend revealed, in passing, that Unroll.me, which is owned by a company called Slice Intelligence, isn't just in the business of tidying up customers' inboxes. Slice makes money by scanning its users' email for receipts, then packaging that information into intel reports on consumer habits. Uber, for example, was paying Slice to find users' Lyft receipts, so it could see how much they were spending each month, "as a proxy for the health of Lyft's business."

The classic non-apology goes something like this: "I'm sorry if you were upset." It's a sneaky way of expressing regret for how one's crappy actions made another person feel, rather than the crappy actions themselves. But the CEO of Unroll.Me -- whose parent company was revealed this weekend to have sold Unroll.Me's anonymised customer data to Uber -- has invented a whole new level of terrible, borderline sociopathic non-apology. He's not sorry that you were upset about your data being sold. He's sorry he got caught.

Everyone is on the lookout for better email management tools -- anything to make dealing with the daily inbox deluge less of a chore. Unroll.me tries to help by making it easier than ever to unsubscribe from mailing lists and keep in touch with the ones you love. The web app is powerful, but its mobile app is an even better way to clear clutter from your inbox.