Tagged With Toys

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There's nothing unique about loving Lego. Millions of people wax nostalgic when they see those colourful bricks. Millions more never stopped building. I've always been a bit in between. I like zoning out by putting stuff together so, every couple of years, I'll buy a Lego set and build it. But then what? Put it on my shelf? Thanks to the new Lego Boost Creative Toolbox, there's another possibility. Turning Lego creations into programmable robots makes them fun (and functional) in an amazing new way.

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Video: Peter Sripol is a talented engineer with an obsession for building RC planes using unorthodox materials. Instead of balsa wood, he's built working aircraft using LEGO, and even Kentucky Fried Chicken buckets. But his masterpiece is successfully turning a tortilla into the world's first edible aircraft.

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Like millions of other kids around the world, after seeing the original trilogy, R2-D2 instantly became my favourite Star Wars character. He seemed like the perfect sidekick, but the real Artoo was from a galaxy far, far away from mine, and the toy versions of the little droid were always lifeless clones of the character I adored. Thirty years later there's still part of me that wants an R2-D2 to call my own, and I think I've finally found him.

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There has been an awakening, Star Wars fans -- one that threatens the structural integrity of your wallet far more than it does the galaxy far, far away. That's right: it's Force Friday II, meaning that from today, September 1, the very first toys from The Last Jedi are going on sale. Get a look at everything we know will be available -- and we'll be adding more all day.

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Welcome back to Toy Aisle, our weekly round up of the coolest toys and merchandise floating around the internet. This week, we've got a festive Lego set, an obscenely over-the-top Nerf cannon, and yes, a Joker figure just resplendent with different emotions. Take a look, and prepare to hide your wallet somewhere safe.

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By today's standards the original Teddy Ruxpin, essentially a stuffed toy bear wrapped around a cassette player, borders on archaic, but in 1985 few toys incorporated any kind of technology, and the bear felt as futuristic to a seven-year-old version of me as the original iPhone did a decade ago. It was one of the first toys that helped spark my lifelong obsession with gadgets, which is why I'm disappointed that the new Teddy Ruxpin, which mostly just mirrors the original's capabilities, doesn't feel revolutionary in any way.