Tagged With tom scott

One of the biggest engineering challenges of building a towering skyscraper isn't keeping the structure from falling over, it's moving all the people around inside of it. To improve efficiency, and facilitate the construction of even taller buildings, Germany's ThyssenKrupp has completely redesigned elevators so that they can move sideways now, too.

Video: Tom Scott took a pair of DJI Phantom 3 drones to the University of Manchester's High Voltage Laboratory, where they can manufacture lightning strikes measuring over a million volts. The goal was to see what happens to a drone were it to get struck by lightning while flown in a storm, and the results will probably surprise no one.

So you're watching sportsball, and your team wins. The stadium fills with confetti, and the broadcast starts to look like total crap. Why does confetti make the players on your expensive TV look like Minecraft characters? The answer lies in the nature of digital video compression.

Video: Nuclear fusion holds promise as a safe, clean source of energy to power our future. We're probably decades away from using fusion as a viable source of energy, but some experimental reactors are already online.

Video: IPv4, the internet address system born out of the birth of the internet, serves as a cautionary tale to always plan ahead: no-one thought there would ever be more than 4.3 billion devices connected to the internet, only to be proved horribly wrong 30 years later. But YouTube planned ahead.

Both global warming and the popularity of downhill skiing are on the rise, a trend that probably seems a little counterintuitive. Hiding behind the scenes are snowmaking machines, which every year convert millions of litres of water into money-making snow.

Video: I've always wondered exactly who is buying Train Simulator 2015, because driving around virtual heavy machinery without causing accidents isn't really my idea of a good afternoon. But if that software is running in a fully immersive high-tech simulator, I start to understand the appeal.

Galco's Soda Pop Stop is a store in Highland Park, LA, with shelves full of an incomprehensible array of soda (and beer!). But it's not just a novelty: it's a trip back to a time when soda pop was a craft industry like modern microbreweries, and the entire nation wasn't hooked on corn syrup.

Video: The water rights that govern how California's water gets used are not the easiest things in the world to understand; working out how they came to be, and how they shaped Los Angeles, is an even trickier thing.