Tagged With the shape of water

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

If we told you last year that a movie about a mute woman having a torrid, romantic relationship with a modernised version of the Creature From the Black Lagoon was going to dominate at the Oscars in terms of nominations, you might have chuckled a little to yourself. 2017 was a simpler time. The 2018 Academy Award nominations are in and there's a lot for genre fans to be happy about.

For anyone familiar with the work of Guillermo Del Toro, they will know that he has a penchant for monster movies, and utilising them to explore both the innate flaws and immense beauty that humanity has to offer.

Although that concept that ‘the humans were the monsters all along’ seems trite, Del Toro manages to explore it in a way that is fresh and intricate. While still hitting on the themes that fans have come to expect from him.

Because The Shape of Water was always meant to be a romantic fairy tale for adults, director Guillermo del Toro knew that if he was going to sell audiences on the idea of an inter-species love affair, he would need to try (in earnest) to make the fish man at least somewhat conventionally attractive. Rather than focusing on the creature's face, hands, or mouth, del Toro made the excellent decision to simply give the fish man a nice arse.

Earlier this month, news broke that the Pentagon had secretly run a $US22 million program to investigate unidentified flying objects - and obtained evidence including footage of Navy F/A-18 pilots chasing a strange craft off the coast of San Diego in 2004 and an alleged warehouse of mysterious "alloys." To this list of evidence we can add the considerably less compelling testimony of The Shape of Water director Guillermo del Toro, who this week told the Hollywood Reporter he saw a "crappy" UFO when he was younger.

As 2017 comes to an end, we start to look back at the year that was. In film, at least, the year was excellent. So excellent, in fact, that figuring out the top 10 scifi, superhero, and fantasy films was incredibly difficult. However, while there are at least 25-30 movies from 2017 deserve at least some recognition, ultimately, the cream rises to the top.

Most movie novelizations do little more than write down what audiences see on the screen. But the novel that's accompanying Guillermo del Toro's new movie The Shape of Water is no mere adaptation. Co-author Daniel Kraus' book and the film tell the same story, of a mute woman who falls in love with an imprisoned and equally mute creature, in two very different ways -- and we have an exclusive excerpt to show how.

Video: Guillermo del Toro's The Shape of Water is a dark fairy tale about the forbidden romance between an amphibious, humanoid cryptid and Elisa, a mute woman who works for the government agency that's secretly keeping him prisoner. Strange as their romance might seem at first, there's an element of mystery to the creature that sort of makes you understand Elisa's fascination.