Tagged With computing

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At Microsoft's Build conference, the dorkiest of companies put on a big show, complete with fog machines and fancy lights, in order to show it's a cool competitor to Apple and Google. The speakers who came on stage during keynotes had stylish hair. "Do they have dressers backstage?" an attendee asked a group of us when it was all over.

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In the perfect world, we'd store absolutely every bit of information generated each day, but that task is almost impossible, even with dedicated efforts like the Internet Archive. Try targeting your efforts more, say just movies. You still have to find a robust, eternal-as-possible storage medium, rock-solid processes and well, making sure that medium isn't highly combustible.

22

It has been nearly two years since Microsoft introduced a new Windows phone. Sure, HP is still making Windows phones and marketing them to businesses, but Microsoft has been basically silent on the subject of its flagging mobile platform since 2015. There have been zero flagship devices, despite the persistent rumours of a super Surface phone. Logic dictates that Microsoft needs to get in the game here.

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Modern processors can run at temperatures ranging from 25 to 90 degrees, depending on configuration, cooling and workload. That said, when a CPU takes on a heavy load, that increase tends to be gradual, rather than instantaneous. And it certainly shouldn't occur for basic, undemanding tasks. Unfortunately, Intel's Core i7-7700k might have a temperature problem, with spikes of 30;deg&C not uncommon when, say, opening a webpage.

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Before it started obsessing about copying Snapchat, Instagram's main goal was getting your phone photos looking their best. The app's smart image processing doesn't have to stay locked on your mobile though — you can replicate the effects in Photoshop or any photo editor with similar tools.

4

Macromedia isn't a name you hear often these days and even if you did, you'd self-correct it to "Adobe" in your head. But we all remember Macromedia Director, a dedicated program for "interactive multimedia" that was all the rage in the 1990s. The decades however have not been kind to Director's popularity, so much so Adobe is putting the brand to bed as early as next month.

8

PC hardware from a few years ago? Relics of another era. How about a decade old? You might as well be talking about fossilised remains. Yet, people still happily run gear such as Intel's venerable Q6600, one of the company's more overclockable quad-core chips, under the belief that it's "good enough". The benchmarks, however, tell a very different story.

4

"Quantum Dot". I know it sounds like a TV show where a guy jumps backwards through time, taking over the bodies of other people and helping them with the grammar and punctuation, but it's a real technology. Honest. In fact, Samsung was one of the first off the mark to integrate quantum dots into its displays, which now includes computer monitors with the announcement of the curved, 24-inch CFG70.

11

In 2012 the Macbook Pro Retina wasn't so much the next stage of laptops as it was a fun oddity by Apple. It was a workstation, designed to handle gruelling video and photo editing tasks with aplomb, but it was missing some workstation musts, like a DVD drive or Ethernet port. Instead it was thinner and lighter than a traditional Macbook Pro, had a gorgeous 1800p display and was outfitted with a solid state drive.