Tagged With super mario 64

For almost anyone who grew up playing video games in the '90s, Super Mario 64 was a blocky rite of passage. But it isn't just gamers who have taken to the mustachioed hero lately. More recently, scientists have to begun to test whether games such as Super Mario 64 could be used to keep people mentally in shape, thanks to its colourful landscapes, simple yet addictive puzzles, and open-world freedom. To that end, a study published last week in PLOS One suggested that elderly people who keep up a daily regimen of Super Mario 64 can increase the amount of grey matter in their brain, and even improve their short-term memory.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

For almost anyone who grew up playing video games in the '90s, Super Mario 64 was a blocky rite of passage. But it isn't just gamers who have taken to the mustachioed hero lately. More recently, scientists have to begun to test whether games such as Super Mario 64 could be used to keep people mentally in shape, thanks to its colourful landscapes, simple yet addictive puzzles, and open-world freedom. To that end, a study published last week in PLOS One suggested that elderly people who keep up a daily regimen of Super Mario 64 can increase the amount of grey matter in their brain, and even improve their short-term memory.