Tagged With srb2

When Doom was released in 1993 it was an undeniable boon to the game modding community, and among the many fan projects built on its bones was Sonic Robo Blast 2. Its slippery physics recalled the most celebrated Sonic titles and Doomguy's inhumanly fast movement meshed perfectly with a a franchise all about speed. Development first began in 1998, and hasn't really stopped since. Unlike many of Doom's dusty one-off level mods, SRB's most recent patch came in May of this year. After almost two decades, the game isn't just surviving -- it's thriving.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

When Doom was released in 1993 it was an undeniable boon to the game modding community, and among the many fan projects built on its bones was Sonic Robo Blast 2. Its slippery physics recalled the most celebrated Sonic titles and Doomguy's inhumanly fast movement meshed perfectly with a a franchise all about speed. Development first began in 1998, and hasn't really stopped since. Unlike many of Doom's dusty one-off level mods, SRB's most recent patch came in May of this year. After almost two decades, the game isn't just surviving -- it's thriving.