Tagged With Science & Health

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In 2009, Kerry McPhail descended Jacques Cousteau-style towards the Axial Volcano, inside the cramped, 30-year-old little submarine DSV Alvin, with a pilot and another scientist. Four hundred and eighty kilometres off the coast of Oregon, they were collecting tubeworms, bacterial mats and bivalves living near a deep sea volcanic vent. These samples could potentially yield new pharmaceutical compounds — and in turn, new chemical cures and desperately needed antibiotics that are yet undiscovered.

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In the midst of today's highly-anticipated House Science Committee hearing on climate science and the scientific method, right around the time that US Congressman Dana Rohrabacher thundered that certain witnesses (the one mainstream climate scientist in the room, specifically) should be ashamed of themselves for daring to criticise the committee's chairman, the livestream gave out. Part of me prayed it would stay down for good, and somehow take the whole committee with it.

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Researchers in Germany recently conducted a study using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on long-term players of violent video games. They set out to prove their hypothesis that gamers have reduced empathy when compared to non-gamers because of, you know, the violent video games.

Guess what they found?

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Thousands of nearly invisible sweat pores live amongst the spiraling ridges on your fingertips. They only reveal themselves if you're patient enough to wait for them to start working. Luckily, the good folks of YouTube's Timelapse Vision Inc. channel were kind enough to create footage of sweating fingerprints that look like a car crash: you don't want to look at it, but once you do, it's impossible to look away.

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Since 1995, hundreds of poor children in Muzaffarpur, India have mysteriously suffered seizures and feelings of brain fogginess, usually in the morning. Many would soon die. This happened every year between May and July: In 2014, for example, Muzaffarpur hospitals admitted 390 kids with the symptoms, resulting in 122 deaths.

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Actual lab tests have revealed that the commonly-cited five-second rule doesn't hold up. And yet, they still can't stop me from eating this piece of floor candy! Who's in charge now, Science?

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In what's being hailed a meteorological first, two back-to-back hurricanes are marching toward Hawaii, both of them threatening torrential rains and rip-roaring winds this week. The closer of the two, hurricane Madeline, could break a second meteorological record as the first hurricane to strike the Big Island since bookkeeping began in 1949.

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Nikola Tesla was both of his time and ahead of it (he has a car company named after him, after all). Besides his contributions to alternating current electrical systems, the inventor predicted smartphones, television and apparently drones, which he thought could cause humanity's destruction.

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Some 380 light years away in the constellation Scorpius lies a star that has puzzled astronomers for over 40 years. Called AR Scorpii, the star flashes brightly and fades again every couple minutes, like a lightbulb on a dimmer switch. Now, astronomers have identified the cause of the flickering, and it's a reminder that the cosmos is still rife with terrifying secrets.