Tagged With Science & Health

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Some folks have big plans for your future. They want you to buy their burgers and nuggets grown from stem cells. One day, meat eaters and vegans might even share their hypothetical burger. That burger will be delicious, environmentally friendly, and be indistinguishable from a regular burger. And they assure you the meat will be real meat, just not ground from slaughtered animals.

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The Planet of the Apes prequels did much to explain how humans lost their status as the dominant species on the planet — a cataclysmic set of events fuelled by a global pandemic known as the "Simian Flu". This virus, the product of a medical experiment gone horribly wrong, wiped out the vast majority of humans, but it boosted the brains of apes. And in the latest instalment of the franchise, the virus has mutated into an insidious new form, affecting humans in some disturbing new ways.

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A new study has highlighted the widespread gender and racial harassment of women of colour working in astronomy and planetary science - harassment at levels unseen by any other gender or racial group in the field.

40 per cent say they feel unsafe in their workplace because of harassment targeted at their gender, and 28 per cent feel unsafe because of harassment targeted at their race, and this 100 per cent needs to change.

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If David Lynch designed a planet, it would be Uranus. Much like every episode of Twin Peaks: The Return, Uranus is fiercely unique and weirdly endearing, even though it makes no fucking sense. The planet's spin axis is 98 degrees, so it essentially rotates on its side — and while we have some idea as to what could have caused that, no one's really sure. That's just how Uranus rolls, literally.

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In 2009, Kerry McPhail descended Jacques Cousteau-style towards the Axial Volcano, inside the cramped, 30-year-old little submarine DSV Alvin, with a pilot and another scientist. Four hundred and eighty kilometres off the coast of Oregon, they were collecting tubeworms, bacterial mats and bivalves living near a deep sea volcanic vent. These samples could potentially yield new pharmaceutical compounds — and in turn, new chemical cures and desperately needed antibiotics that are yet undiscovered.

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In the midst of today's highly-anticipated House Science Committee hearing on climate science and the scientific method, right around the time that US Congressman Dana Rohrabacher thundered that certain witnesses (the one mainstream climate scientist in the room, specifically) should be ashamed of themselves for daring to criticise the committee's chairman, the livestream gave out. Part of me prayed it would stay down for good, and somehow take the whole committee with it.

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Researchers in Germany recently conducted a study using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on long-term players of violent video games. They set out to prove their hypothesis that gamers have reduced empathy when compared to non-gamers because of, you know, the violent video games.

Guess what they found?

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Thousands of nearly invisible sweat pores live amongst the spiraling ridges on your fingertips. They only reveal themselves if you're patient enough to wait for them to start working. Luckily, the good folks of YouTube's Timelapse Vision Inc. channel were kind enough to create footage of sweating fingerprints that look like a car crash: you don't want to look at it, but once you do, it's impossible to look away.

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Since 1995, hundreds of poor children in Muzaffarpur, India have mysteriously suffered seizures and feelings of brain fogginess, usually in the morning. Many would soon die. This happened every year between May and July: In 2014, for example, Muzaffarpur hospitals admitted 390 kids with the symptoms, resulting in 122 deaths.