Tagged With russia

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The first major legislative effort to rein in foreign interference in US elections will kick off Thursday afternoon on Capitol Hill, where Democratic Senators Mark Warner and Amy Klobuchar will field questions from reporters over a new bill crafted, they said, to "improve transparency of online political ads."

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Bitcoin's having a wild moment. It kicked off with a strange flash crash registered by the CoinDesk tracker that momentarily caused the cryptocurrency to appear to plunge by 12 per cent. Almost simultaneously, Russian President Vladimir Putin called for regulatory restrictions on digital currencies for the first time. And then, as it does in recent times, Bitcoin's price just went up.

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Russian actors spent tens of thousands of dollars on Google ads meant to interfere with the 2016 US presidential election, the Washington Post reported on Monday. Citing employees "familiar" with Google's internal investigations, the Post reports that these ads, which appeared on Gmail and YouTube, "do not appear to be from the same... troll farm that bought ads on Facebook".

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Facebook turned over 3000 ads to US Congress on Monday that the company says were purchased by a now-defunct troll farm with known Kremlin ties. In a blog post, Facebook said the ads reached as many as 10 million Americans and there could be more Russian-funded political ads it hasn't discovered yet.

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Facebook announced today that it sold $US100,000 ($125,120) worth of ads to a sketchy network of fake Russian accounts between June 2015 to May 2017, a period spanning the 2016 US election cycle. The ads often mentioned particular political issues, such as LGBT rights or gun control, but rarely mentioned a specific political candidate or the US presidential election.

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As Russia transitions into an internet dystopia, it appears that Snapchat has been dragged right in. Today, Snapchat's parent company Snap was registered as an "information distribution organiser". And by 1 July 2018, an amended law will require "information distribution organisers" to store months of user data, and make it available for the Russian law enforcement upon request.

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It turns out the recognisable half-circle arch of a rainbow is a complete lie. When you're standing on the ground looking up at a rainbow in the sky, the curvature of the Earth usually blocks its bottom half. But when viewed from a higher vantage point, like from a plane, or the top of a crane, rainbows are magically revealed to be a complete circle.