Tagged With remote controlled

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Ask any parent and they'll tell you the best toys are the ones that leave kids exhausted and ready for a long peaceful nap. So instead of buying them a traditional RC toy car that chews through batteries or leaves them bored while they're waiting for it to charge, consider the $20 DynamoGo which makes them earn every last second of playtime.

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We've already brought you a few clips of Kenji Ishida's amazing self-transforming RC cars, but he's only made about 10 of them available to the public so far at a staggering $US24,000 a piece. There's great news for those of us who've chosen to pay off our mortgages instead of buying a toy robot: Takara Tomy is apparently working with Kenji and Brave Robotics to mass produce these as what will probably be the greatest toy ever.

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More and more vehicles are coming equipped with emergency braking systems that can stop a car before it hits something. And as CCP realised, the same technology could be just as useful with a remote control toy. After all, you're putting an untrained, unlicensed kid in control of a small car that can seriously bang up your home's walls and furniture.

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It was impressive enough when toymakers found a way to make remote control helicopters small and safe enough to fly around indoors. But their miniaturisation efforts continue on as toymaker Silverlit introduces the Nano-Falcon, an RC chopper so tiny that Guinness has officially granted it the world record for smallest IR-controlled helicopter.

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Had the Wright Brothers foolishly chosen to build their original flyer from concrete, their names probably wouldn't have gone down in the history books. But South Dakota School of Mines & Technology students David Haberman and Tyler Pojanowski did, and they were the first to fly and safely land an 8kg remote-controlled concrete aircraft.

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It's kind of hard to justify spending $15,000 on a remote-controlled toy truck when you can get a real car for that much money. But there are certain advantages to opting for this 1:3 scale monster from Mammuth Works. You don't need a licence to drive it, you don't need insurance, it's easy to park on a footpath, and there's minimal risk of getting hurt if you roll it doing stupid stunts.