Tagged With remember your first kiss and how bad it was

Tubelip wrasses live on coral reefs stretching from the eastern coast of Africa to far-flung atolls in the South Pacific. They get their name from their bizarre lips, which are conspicuously curled, making them look like someone glued a PVC pipe onto their face. It's these lips that allow the wrasse to feed on their favourite food -- coral -- and scientists have only now detailed how in a new paper in the journal Current Biology, revealing a strange predation mechanism never before described by science. The technique basically involves vanquishing food with a slime-slicked, World's Worst First Kiss, over and over again.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Tubelip wrasses live on coral reefs stretching from the eastern coast of Africa to far-flung atolls in the South Pacific. They get their name from their bizarre lips, which are conspicuously curled, making them look like someone glued a PVC pipe onto their face. It's these lips that allow the wrasse to feed on their favourite food -- coral -- and scientists have only now detailed how in a new paper in the journal Current Biology, revealing a strange predation mechanism never before described by science. The technique basically involves vanquishing food with a slime-slicked, World's Worst First Kiss, over and over again.