Tagged With razer

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For more than decade, Razer has peddled aggressive, brightly coloured peripherals and PCs to people who cared more about frame rates and kill death ratios than mainstream appeal. But when Razer launched its first ultraportable laptop last year, it was a very different, relatively game-free story. Now, the Stealth is back with an even more refined design and a slightly bigger screen, but it still isn't any good at playing games -- and there isn't even a speck of neon green paint on it. That's very not Razer.

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Is it a phone? Or maybe a tablet with removable gamepads kind of like a Nintendo Switch? No one really knows, but Razer has been rumoured to be working on a mobile gaming gaming device for quite some time now, and according to a new interview between CNBC and Razer CEO Min-Liang Tan, it seems like that might actually happen.

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Affordability and Razer are not, typically, words that go together. The PC peripheral company has developed a reputation in the last few years for making sharp looking laptops that are ultra thin and ultra pricey for the guts inside of them. But the new 1080p Razer Blade Pro, at $US2300 ($2,893), is positively reasonable. No one else is making a giant laptop that is this thin and powerful at that price.

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The new Razer Blade Stealth is an unusual beast, in a good way. It exists as a product manufactured by a company that proudly states on the cardboard box that it ships in they are “For Gamers, By Gamers” but, like the previous model, it doesn’t really feel like a gaming laptop.

No, the Blade Stealth isn’t a gaming laptop.

But it is one of the best ultrabooks you can buy.

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It's the question that every PC nerd has asked themselves as they've been poring over online store listings: should I buy a mechanical keyboard with clicky tactile switches, or one with silent and linear keys? I compared two otherwise identical keyboards over a couple of weeks of gaming and typing to find my own personal favourite -- and try to figure out why that was.

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Virtual reality has been around for decades, but it's only of late that the technology has properly matured with reliable consumer-grade headsets, room-scale tracking, high quality touch controllers and a library of games worth exploring.

So now that people can get into virtual reality in a range of ways - from mobiles to consoles to the top-end headsets - what's changed? Here's everything you need to know about VR.

Shared from Kotaku

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Not long after the first Deathadder launched, there was discussion amongst Counter-Strike circles about what was the best mouse to buy. The Intellimouse Optical or Logitech's MX500 were the two favourites. But Microsoft had canned production of the former, and the shape of Logitech's offerings (with the concave indent for your thumb) was very particular, and not at all conducive for certain mouse grips. So if you were in the market for a new mouse, or your Intellimouse had just died, what was a gamer to do?

The go-to mouse became the Deathadder: it had the same shape as the fat Intellimouse Optical mice, the optical sensor was just as reliable at the end of a tournament as it was at home, and it felt good in the hand. Razer's since refreshed the Deathadder line with the Deathadder Elite, and it's just as good as the original Deathadder was over a decade ago.

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Slim laptops with half-decent dedicated graphics are hard to come by. Slim gaming laptops that look good are harder again. Beyond Alienware and its ilk, we've always been fans of Razer's skinny Blade -- and now you can buy the latest hardware update of the 14-inch machine in Australia.

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Despite all the extraordinary advances in technology -- particularly computing technology -- there is one place where we've languished. It's a key facet of the future that was, in many ways, better in 1987 than in 2017: The keyboard.

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Razer is a gaming company. Or was, I guess. It's now something... more complicated. The brand best known for its gaming peripherals and MacBook-esque slim gaming laptops just bought Nextbit, the smartphone hardware startup best known for its Robin.

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Razer had some of the coolest tech of CES in 2017. First there was the enormous 17-inch 12K laptop with three screens and enough LEDs to light a small runway. Then there was the sleek alien-looking projector that expanded a game's image well beyond the edges of the TV screen. Gizmodo was impressed with these prototypes. So were some thieves, who stole at least two prototype samples from Razer's booth during the show.

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You know what the laptop needed to make it better? It doesn't need better battery life or to be lighter or thinner. It needs three goddamn 4K displays strapped onto one device. At least that is what Razer thinks, and having played with its new concept device, Project Valerie, I've got to say, I'm down with having a laptop that's thick as a brick so long as it has three 17.3-inch monitors built in. That's a lot of pixels.

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Razer has built a "tournament-grade' controller for the PlayStation 4 -- with supposedly better ergonomics than your common or garden DualShock, as well as a bunch of customisable settings and esports-friendly extras. And, y'know, it looks suspiciously like someone chucked an Xbox One controller and a PS4 controller into Photoshop and mucked around with the transparency.

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I'd customised the brightly lit keyboard of the Razer Blade Stealth with all the meticulousness of a gamer, but I hadn't just customised it for games. When it opened up Photoshop, the most mundane of apps, and the entire keyboard was a rainbow of coloured keys. The Heal key was green, the Move key was blue, and the Crop key was red. While not as fancy as the MacBook Pro's new Touch Bar or the customisable OLED keys on the old Razer Blade Pro, this was a little spec of useful customizability for productive people, and it comes in a $1479 gaming laptop.