Tagged With razer

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Virtual reality has been around for decades, but it's only of late that the technology has properly matured with reliable consumer-grade headsets, room-scale tracking, high quality touch controllers and a library of games worth exploring.

So now that people can get into virtual reality in a range of ways - from mobiles to consoles to the top-end headsets - what's changed? Here's everything you need to know about VR.

Shared from Kotaku

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Not long after the first Deathadder launched, there was discussion amongst Counter-Strike circles about what was the best mouse to buy. The Intellimouse Optical or Logitech's MX500 were the two favourites. But Microsoft had canned production of the former, and the shape of Logitech's offerings (with the concave indent for your thumb) was very particular, and not at all conducive for certain mouse grips. So if you were in the market for a new mouse, or your Intellimouse had just died, what was a gamer to do?

The go-to mouse became the Deathadder: it had the same shape as the fat Intellimouse Optical mice, the optical sensor was just as reliable at the end of a tournament as it was at home, and it felt good in the hand. Razer's since refreshed the Deathadder line with the Deathadder Elite, and it's just as good as the original Deathadder was over a decade ago.

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Slim laptops with half-decent dedicated graphics are hard to come by. Slim gaming laptops that look good are harder again. Beyond Alienware and its ilk, we've always been fans of Razer's skinny Blade — and now you can buy the latest hardware update of the 14-inch machine in Australia.

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Despite all the extraordinary advances in technology — particularly computing technology — there is one place where we've languished. It's a key facet of the future that was, in many ways, better in 1987 than in 2017: The keyboard.

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Razer is a gaming company. Or was, I guess. It's now something... more complicated. The brand best known for its gaming peripherals and MacBook-esque slim gaming laptops just bought Nextbit, the smartphone hardware startup best known for its Robin.

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Razer had some of the coolest tech of CES in 2017. First there was the enormous 17-inch 12K laptop with three screens and enough LEDs to light a small runway. Then there was the sleek alien-looking projector that expanded a game's image well beyond the edges of the TV screen. Gizmodo was impressed with these prototypes. So were some thieves, who stole at least two prototype samples from Razer's booth during the show.

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You know what the laptop needed to make it better? It doesn't need better battery life or to be lighter or thinner. It needs three goddamn 4K displays strapped onto one device. At least that is what Razer thinks, and having played with its new concept device, Project Valerie, I've got to say, I'm down with having a laptop that's thick as a brick so long as it has three 17.3-inch monitors built in. That's a lot of pixels.

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Razer has built a "tournament-grade' controller for the PlayStation 4 — with supposedly better ergonomics than your common or garden DualShock, as well as a bunch of customisable settings and esports-friendly extras. And, y'know, it looks suspiciously like someone chucked an Xbox One controller and a PS4 controller into Photoshop and mucked around with the transparency.

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I'd customised the brightly lit keyboard of the Razer Blade Stealth with all the meticulousness of a gamer, but I hadn't just customised it for games. When it opened up Photoshop, the most mundane of apps, and the entire keyboard was a rainbow of coloured keys. The Heal key was green, the Move key was blue, and the Crop key was red. While not as fancy as the MacBook Pro's new Touch Bar or the customisable OLED keys on the old Razer Blade Pro, this was a little spec of useful customizability for productive people, and it comes in a $1479 gaming laptop.

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Razer has a gaming problem. That might be confusing to hear if you just know the company for its excellent keyboards and mice. Razer is a company built for gamers by gamers, and it has a well-deserved reputation for making great products for its core audience. Some of its products are so good, in fact, that they should be used by way more than just gamers.

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My first gaming mouse completely changed PC gaming for me. I’d previously thought of such peripherals as luxuries only for hardcore gamers, those who entered tournaments and won, and I was but a lowly pub match scrub. I'm still a lowly pub match scrub, but now I consider my gaming mouse a necessity for my hours-long DOTA 2 sessions. As Razer’s new Naga Hex v2 claims to be the gaming mouse for MOBA fiends like me, I was eager to find out if it would help me to improve my K/D/A.

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Laptops made by gaming companies are usually big, chunky, heavy, bulky slabs of plastic and metal and silicon and glass that you have to carry around with both hands. You don't want to take them too far from their chargers either. Usually. Razer's new Blade Stealth is a laptop from a gaming company, but it's not necessarily a gaming laptop; it's a laptop that can be used for gaming if you're so inclined, but straight out of the box it's essentially a MacBook Pro — but a cooler MacBook Pro, because it's black and has flashy lights.