Tagged With queen bees

New research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln shows that a widely-used class of nicotine-based insecticides is causing queen bees to lay substantially fewer eggs than normal. This particular class of insecticides -- the most popular in the world -- has also been linked to colony collapse disorder, a mysterious phenomenon in which the majority of worker bees suddenly abandon the hive, leaving immature bees and the queen behind.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

New research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln shows that a widely-used class of nicotine-based insecticides is causing queen bees to lay substantially fewer eggs than normal. This particular class of insecticides -- the most popular in the world -- has also been linked to colony collapse disorder, a mysterious phenomenon in which the majority of worker bees suddenly abandon the hive, leaving immature bees and the queen behind.