Tagged With propaganda

If you've ever watched the History Channel at 3AM, you know that the Nazis had a secret program during World War II to develop flying saucers. The Nazi's UFO experiments never actually flew, but the model toy company Revell recently released a set in Germany that makes it look as though one of the Nazi saucers actually worked. And historians are pissed.

America's involvement in the First World War was brief, but intense. For a period of 20 months, the US government did its best to stir patriotic fervour, in part through the use of eye-catching propaganda posters. A new exhibit at Bruce Museum is showcasing a selection of these works, many of which are seriously lacking in nuance.

Three of Silicon Valley's biggest tech companies will speak to three different congressional subcommittees on Wednesday and Thursday to finally get to the bottom of, well, a lot of issues. Top priority is to discuss Russia's use of online ads and social media to influence the 2016 US election. Here's how you can watch it all live, no pay TV required.

The first major legislative effort to rein in foreign interference in US elections will kick off Thursday afternoon on Capitol Hill, where Democratic Senators Mark Warner and Amy Klobuchar will field questions from reporters over a new bill crafted, they said, to "improve transparency of online political ads."

The classic US stereotype of attempted Iranian ideological indoctrination via chants of "Death to America" and such has been old hat for quite some time. As noted by the New York Times on Saturday, in the past few years Iranian pro-government propaganda efforts have increasingly taken the form of rap videos glorifying the country's military, spread on sites like local YouTube equivalent Apparat and apps like Telegram.

Back in January, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said he was "quite proud of the impact that we were able to have on civic discourse", doubling down on his stance that the rise of misinformation, spread of outright propaganda, and rapid erosion of trust in the fourth estate were anyone's problems but his. A whitepaper from the world's largest social media platform -- where an estimated 66 per cent of the site's American users get their news -- casually mentions that Facebook is also fertile soil for "subtle and insidious forms of misuse, including attempts to manipulate civic discourse and deceive people".

In a surprise move, RT (formerly known as Russia Today) was temporarily banned from posting articles, photos and videos to Facebook. The ban was instituted yesterday after RT allegedly ran a pirated stream of Obama's last press conference. The ban was scheduled to be lifted at 6:35AM AEDT on Sunday, the day after Trump's inauguration. Facebook lifted the ban at around 6:35AM this morning, after around 20 hours.

Jeff Shell, an executive with NBCUniversal, was detained in Moscow last night when he tried to enter Russia. After hours of confusion, he was ultimately told that he couldn't enter the country. Was the Kremlin still angry about Evan Almighty? Probably not. The New York Times mentions that Mr Shell is also the chairman of the Broadcasting Board of Governors. The part they kind of gloss over? The BBG is the propaganda arm of the United States.

China is notorious for employing an estimated two million government propagandists online. But new research on their tactics reveals a surprising strategy: China's online army isn't trying to argue with anyone who opposes the government. It's just changing the subject.