Tagged With privacy

6

A while back, I woke up to find my Android phone lingering at a pattern unlock screen. Not just to unlock my screen, but a prompt to decrypt all of my phone's data. I was puzzled. Every other morning, I decrypted my device using a 10-digit, alphanumeric passphrase — something I perceived, accurately, as being infinitely more secure than tracing a dumb pattern with my finger.

0

Uber has rightfully taken heat for its past privacy overreaches: Tracking riders after they get dropped off, tracking Lyft drivers, tracking and circumventing law enforcement, tracking critical journalists. A lot of tracking in situations where people expected not to be tracked!

0

The smart speakers are coming! Wandering into our living rooms, listening for our voice commands, pulling random bits of trivia from the web, spitting out weather forecasts, and controlling a growing number of home appliances. But they're always listening and currently there isn't an easy to way to know when they aren't (apart from hitting a mute button). So how do you stop TV ads, young kids and dumb roommates from controlling your speakers and revealing your most intimate secrets?

7

If you've ever considered sharing your every move with a significant other, you probably have an opinion about location-sharing apps. "This is great! I'll always know where they are!" is one opinion. "This is creepy! I'm not trying to stalk someone I could easy talk to instead!" is another. I'm of that second opinion.

1

As Russia transitions into an internet dystopia, it appears that Snapchat has been dragged right in. Today, Snapchat's parent company Snap was registered as an "information distribution organiser". And by 1 July 2018, an amended law will require "information distribution organisers" to store months of user data, and make it available for the Russian law enforcement upon request.

13

I'm listening to Lana Del Rey right now. Her first album dropped during an emotional phase of my life, and while I'm sometimes embarrassed to admit it, I really like Born to Die. But, until a week ago, I avoided listening to it because my listening activity flipped a switch with my friends who could see me listening to Lana Del Rey on Spotify. Yes, my friends would see my listening habits, and then they'd make fun of me. This is what a world without privacy looks like.