Tagged With powerwall

A "Virtual Power Plant" in South Australia has goals to not only increase the reliability of the state's energy network, but to also deliver energy bill savings of up to 30 per cent for thousands of low income households.

The first 100 Housing SA homes have just had solar panels and Tesla Powerwall batteries installed as part of the Tesla Virtual Power Plant project.

Tesla continues to slowly roll out more stores around Australia, and the latest is in SA -- the state that might just be Elon Musk's favourite, given the giant battery currently being installed there. The new Tesla store at Westfield Marion is, appropriately, more about renewable energy storage than it is about the company's electric car fleet.

Beginning in Melbourne's Federation Square today and tomorrow (August 14 and 15), there's a tiny Tesla house making the rounds of the country - showing off the Powerwall and educating the public on how to generate, store and use renewable energy for your home.

Oh, and the tiny home is towed by a Tesla Model X, because of course it is.

Since the Tesla Powerwall burst onto the scene less than two years ago, home batteries have never seemed like a smarter or more viable investment for households with solar. Soon enough it wasn't just Tesla - other options quickly began popping up on the market, giving us a vast variety of batteries for all different homes with all different needs.

We set out to speak to three early adopters of battery technology to see what it's like to live with solar batteries and measure how they have impacted their energy use and - most importantly - their power bills.

Tesla is building the world's largest lithium-ion battery in South Australia -- an installation 60 per cent larger than any other large-scale battery energy storage system on the planet.

In partnership with the SA government and French renewables company Neoen, alongside the third stage of the Hornsdale Wind Farm, the PowerPack battery farm will top 100 megawatts of capacity and provide 129 megawatt-hours of energy generation to the region -- load balancing the state's renewable energy generation and allowing emergency back-up power if a shortfall in energy production is predicted.

With electricity prices on the rise and an uncertain future ahead for Australian electricity, it's not surprising that more and more Aussies are looking to home batteries to save them. What is surprising is just how fast the market is progressing - batteries are rapidly decreasing in price and the numbers suggest they aren't just for early adopters anymore.

Melbourne's first Powerwall 2 has been installed at a three-bedroom, one storey house in Coburg. Brendan Fahey and his wife Josephine added Tesla's shiny new battery to their home to complement their existing solar panels, after Brendan calculated that the Powerwall 2 could take his energy bill down almost to zero.

Tesla has announced Australian pre-orders for its solar roof, with installations starting in 2018. The idea is fantastic -- replace your house roof with solar tiles that look good, generate power and are even more durable than existing options. But in the real world, is it worth the price? We crunch the numbers to find out.

In sunny Australia, household rooftop solar can be a great way to generate some of your own power, and potentially save money off your electrical bill. Thanks to recent technology improvements and price reductions, home battery storage makes it possible to store the sun’s energy and use it again at night. But as more and more players enter the market, which option is right for you?

Aussie home builder Metricon Homes has teamed up with solar provider CSR Bradford to offer a 5kW 'Solar ChargePack' including a Powerwall 2 battery, solar panels and inverter to every new house that the company builds in South Australia. It's saying the battery and solar setup, at a small additional cost on top of, y'know, an actual house, could make residents up to 90 per cent self-sufficient and save over $2000 in electricity bills per year.

Tesla’s unveiling of its new Powerwall 2 battery with a built-in AC inverter -- along with some upcoming solar roof tile products -- takes a leaf from the Apple playbook of vertical integration. It’s the latest step on a corporate path, including the imminent merger with SolarCity, that moves Tesla closer to being a vertically integrated provider of energy solutions.

As with the Apple product ecosystem, this aims to establish Tesla as a single entry point for energy generation and storage systems in the home environment. Tesla has both the name and the resources to become a strong player in this realm.

Tesla's second Aussie customer testimonial video -- after Internode founder and long-time Tesla fan Simon Hackett -- is called "Fully Charged", and it follows a customer from Queensland who owns both a Tesla Model S and a Powerwall battery and solar setup for his home. Clint Luna charges his car and powers his home using the Powerwall, relying on the state's sunny weather for a reliable solar-powered boost.

Thanks to Natural Solar and the Pfitzner family, we now have real-world usage figures from a solar panel setup and Powerwall combination system. While promising, the announcement was a little light on in details, so we got a hold of the full figures and did a number crunching analysis of the results. So is the setup worth it?