Tagged With pokémon

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Like many people who dropped hundreds of dollars on an Apple Watch, Gabriel O'Flaherty-Chan was disappointed at how little his pricey wearable could actually do. Instead of complaining about it online like most of us, he decided to solve the problem himself by writing a Game Boy emulator capable of playing Pokemon Yellow. Unfortunately, it kind of sucks.

Last month, a grown man in fluffy Pikachu jammies performed a manic routine from Hell on Russian state-controlled Channel 1, complete with Pokébabes and Pokéhunks dancing with giant prop iPhones, half-twerking and bouncing about on blow-up Pokéballs.

This past weekend, many Pokemon GO gyms were rendered unplayable. Players trying to battle at sites like Big Ben were greeted not by a 'mon but by an egg that glitched the game, protecting these gyms from being defeated. Eggs appeared in New York City, London and elsewhere -- and almost all of them were placed there by the same person.

Niantic Inc., the company behind that app you won't stop hearing about Pokémon Go, has taken a stand against cheaters in the past, or anybody who violates its terms of service, such as sending out cease and desist letters to tracker apps. Now the company has stated that it will outright ban users for those violations.

Video: Does it ever feel like all you see in Pokemon GO is that stupid Pidgey bird or that dumb Ekans snake one or that ugly Zubat? There's a simple reason for this: They obviously get carpet bombed all over the Earth to clutter your map and drain your smartphone battery. Or at least, that's what Nixolas imagines. His hilarious and wonderful CG work on how Pokemon GO spawns the most common Pokemon is so damn good.

Video: Well, that's not bad. There's a bit of prop help to recreate Pikachu's body and ears -- but the transformation from human face to Pikachu is all done with makeup applied on the fly by Chrisspy. It's kind of scary how much she ends up looking like that cute little Pokémon.

I'm in the back of a Gregory's Coffee in New York's midtown across from Dronpes and flanked by Moots7, who are careful to tell me as little about themselves as possible. From what I can gather Moots works in finance and comes from rural Colorado, while Dronpes is a developer at a tech company, hard-working with a cautious, controlling streak. Both are tall, stubbly white guys in their late 20s -- the right age to have fond memories of the first generation Pokemon games. Six months ago they embarked on creating The Silph Road, a project that has become the Pokemon GO player's bible.

It’s been a few weeks since the launch of the app that even your neighbour who you've never met is talking about. Pokemon Go is now playable in over 50 countries, with the latest location being Nintendo’s origin country, Japan. The smartphone game has made Nintendo more valuable than Sony in less than a week, forced both US presidential nominees to mention the word ‘Pokemon’ in their speeches, and even taught social skills to young people with autism. If you’re not a fan of Pokemon Go you might have installed the PokeGone Chrome extension to try silencing the Internet.

However, if you’re still trying to be the very best, then take note of these actually useful tips from five level 25+ players to guide you this weekend.