Tagged With plants

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It's one of the biggest mysteries in this global experiment we're conducting by pouring 10 billion tonnes of carbon into the atmosphere each year: What will happen to the plants? Will the relentless burning of fossil fuels prompt our leafy green friends to suck down more CO2, tapping the brakes on climate change? Or are the trees unable to bail Earth's atmosphere out this mess?

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In the TV series, Star Trek: Voyager, the space ship was the first of its kind to be built with biological circuitry designed to speed up its processing capabilities. What once was science fiction, however, creeps closer to reality as researchers have successfully created a cyborg rose that functions as an electronic circuit.

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When farmers spray their crops with pesticides and other treatments to help ensure their survival, 98 per cent of those chemicals bounce right off the plants and end up in the groundwater as pollution. It's a waste, and harmful to the environment, so researchers at MIT came up with a cheap but effective way to instead make those chemicals stick to crops.

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Sunflowers may look like the sun if you squint your eyes a bit, but they also do this weird thing where they turn to face the sun, hence the name. But how and why these plants move over the course of a day has stumped scientists for over a century.

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Video: Meet the Drosera Capensis, also known as the Cape sundew. It's a deadly little thing that looks like some sort of alien finger trap, but it's actually a carnivorous plant with sticky tentacles that basically entomb bugs that come across its way. It's incredible to see how it traps the bug as if it were hugging it to paralyse it, and then folding vertically to trap it forever.

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Video: We stamped out nature in New York City with people and the grid, leaving behind only tiny patches and bits of green. But eventually, and especially after the zombie apocalypse hits, Mother Nature and her wild plants will take New York back from us. This animated short, Wrapped by Filmakademie Baden-Wuerttemberg, shows a glimpse of that happening. It's pretty awesome, like a vision of an untamed city far off into the uncertain future.

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The Venus flytrap is perhaps the best known of carnivorous plants — those that get essential nutrients from trapping and consuming insects, particularly when they can't get enough from the soil. Now a team of German scientists has discovered that the flytrap can actually count, and this ability is the key to knowing the difference between the presence of prey and a false alarm.