Tagged With planck telescope

Today, physicists across the world celebrated as telescopes and observatories on Earth and in space captured a "kilonova." Two neutron stars collided 130 million light years away, sending gravitational waves, x-rays, gamma-rays, radio waves, and light waves to the Earth. But these events also serve as a new kind of tool -- a tool with the potential to answer one of the most fundamental questions in our universe: How quickly is it expanding?

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Today, physicists across the world celebrated as telescopes and observatories on Earth and in space captured a "kilonova." Two neutron stars collided 130 million light years away, sending gravitational waves, x-rays, gamma-rays, radio waves, and light waves to the Earth. But these events also serve as a new kind of tool -- a tool with the potential to answer one of the most fundamental questions in our universe: How quickly is it expanding?