Tagged With piracy

Many file sharers want the highest quality copy of a film they can find, and until recently, those would most often come from ripping a 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray disc. Links to these files are clearly labelled as such, but a few weeks ago a 2160P copy of Aquaman leaked onto the internet claiming it instead originated from an online streaming service.

It was soon followed by uploads of 2160P copies of 24 James Bond films, which are currently only available from Apple, leading many to wonder if someone has finally found a way around iTunes’ 4K copy protection and DRM.

The most expensive film ever made in India is out around the globe, and its producers are very serious about shutting down piracy of the film.

So serious that they were able to obtain a court order forcing local internet providers to block 12,564 domain names — many of which aren’t even registered. It appears this brute-force approach to piracy didn’t even work.

Back in February 2015, legislation was passed that allowed content rights holders to apply for an order to block websites that "facilitate piracy" in Australia.

Today at The Federal Court of Australia in Sydney, various internet service providers - from Telstra to TPG - were ordered to block 28 torrent sites including watchfreemovies and 123Hulu, within 15 business days.

Shared from The Sydney Morning Herald

As Australians lose their taste for BitTorrent, content owners are opening up a new front in the war on copyright infringement.

It was always going to be difficult to measure the effect of Australia's piracy crackdown when it's child's play to bypass the blocks on BitTorrent search engines like The Pirate Bay. Meanwhile there are tricks for cloaking BitTorrent traffic, so the copyright police can't claim they're winning the war simply because they're catching fewer pirates in the act.

Not all VPNs are created equal. Some keep logs, some cap your traffic, some don't work on mobile, some don't work at all. This is what you need to know about choosing a VPN provider, as well as a few recommendations to get you started.

Shared from SMH

Despite the streaming revolution we're still paying more than Americans for content, and getting less in return. Hollywood and the music studios have always treated Australians as second-class citizens to be fleeced and it seems that little has changed with the subscription streaming revolution. While globalisation works in favour of big business, we're still expected to abide by geo-blocking and shop local even when we're getting screwed.

Shared from Lifehacker

In August, Creative Content Australia (CCA) launched their ‘Price of Piracy’ campaign, which aims to shed light on the issue of using torrent and streaming websites to illegally access content. Specifically, it wants to highlight the inherent risk users put themselves in when accessing these sites.

This campaign is the biggest anti-piracy push in Australia's history - but are scare campaigns really the right way to prevent people from downloading? And how do the facts and figures actually stack up?

Foxtel Now was supposed to be the solution to all of Foxtel's problems -- a new streaming service with a new identity, for all Australians. And, for a while, it was great. But come last night and come Game of Thrones, it died. And now the arguments of pirates, so close to being comprehensively defeated, restart anew.

Shared from Lifehacker

Dear Gizmodo, Like thousands of my fellow countrymen, I will be watching Game Of Thrones via illegal means this year. I refuse to be locked into a costly Foxtel contract for one show and the Blu-rays don't come out for ages. I feel it's a justifiable crime.

With that said, I'm sure the law probably doesn't agree, which brings me to my question. In respect to Australia's new anti-piracy laws, will anything bad happen to me if I dodge Foxtel this year? Or do the powers-that-be remain as toothless as before? Should I be worried?