Tagged With oled

I was in a trendy hotel in Sydney when I decided to indulge in some controversial and downright dirty behaviour. I was going to do something that you're really not supposed to. Something naughty.

I was going to test Sony's shiny new A9F OLED by plugging my Xbox One X into it.

While we're not expecting any major phone news to come out of WWDC (aside from the possible appearance of the iPhone SE 2), all sorts of iPhone rumours are hitting the street as Apple's annual developer conference nears. The rumours range from some plausible changes and upgrades to some very silly-looking new colours.

LG just released its shiny new 2018 OLED range. We recently spent an evening doing a side-by-side comparison with the 65-inch E8 model and one of the 2017 models. Here are some thoughts after spending an evening with it.

The CES show floor might be filled with hundreds of TVs that put your local electronics store to shame, but the real treasures of the show, the TVs packed with technology we'll have to wait for years to buy, are hidden in back rooms away from greasy fingers. Except ours, of course, as we had a chance to treat our eyes to the concepts LG Display brought to CES 2018.

Whenever I think 'OLED', I think $$$$$. Whenever I think Hisense, I think 'cost-effective'. So what might happen if those two things were to collide? We're about to find out, as Hisense Australia has announced a brand spanking new OLED TV for the AU Market, to land alongside its already available ULED 4K TV models.

Shared from The Sydney Morning Herald

The new high dynamic range 165-centimetre OLED televisions from Panasonic and Sony will stop you in your tracks. They're stunning. Pin-sharp definition, beautiful colour balance (to my eye the Sony has a fractional edge) and detail just a tad short of real life. But it's the contrast that blows everything else away. With no backlighting, OLEDs – organic, light-emitting diodes – make blacks utterly black and present excellent detail in dark scenes. OLEDs are also super thin, adding almost nothing to the thickness of the surface they're applied to.

The technology powering the display on your phone, or even your TV, is a lot different than it was even ten years ago. More colours, more pixels, and a whole lot more acronyms and complex terms that mean something -- even if you have no idea what that something is. Display technology in 2017 is a complicated business, but if you understand some basic concepts and a few of the acronyms everything starts to be about as clear as that sweet iPhone display you might be reading this on.

Sony's not the first to the party with a big-screen OLED. That honour goes to LG, which has cornered the market for a few years with its excellent panels. But, after those were joined a few weeks ago by Panasonic's Master OLEDs, it's time for Sony's Bravias to turn up: and boy, has Sony turned up.

I think, I think, that this just might be the best TV you can buy.

After a couple of years of LG OLED TVs ruling the roost in top-end picture quality, Panasonic has an OLED TV now too. In fact, it has what it says is the best OLED TV, taking all the experience its engineers had from years of amazing quality plasma TVs. The EZ1000 is the top in its Master OLED range, and as well as being a badass OLED panel it incorporates a top-of-the-line built-in soundbar using Technics audio.
Is it worth nearly $9000 of your hard-earned cash, though?

After two years of LG ruling the roost with OLED TVs, it's time for a new competitor to enter the ring. Panasonic has two top-of-the-line OLED TVs on the way for Australia in 2017, and the company is talking up its years of experience with quality plasma screens to sell its new 'Master OLED' displays.

LG (currently) has the monopoly on OLED screens, and for good reason - the technology is notoriously expensive and difficult to engineer. But the results? Genuinely the closest you will get to a high-quality cinema experience in the home.

But after spending the night with LG's latest OLED range, I'd say it's even better.

Every year at CES, LG gives us a look at its craziest ideas for the future of display technology. At a press conference earlier yesterday, the company showed off its refreshed OLED televisions, regarded by many as the best on the market. In a private briefing at the Las Vegas Convention Center, Gizmodo was shown LG's bold concepts for the future of displays, which are (unbelievably) getting thinner and brighter. They are among the most lifelike displays I've ever seen.

At 2.57mm thick, LG's new OLED W7 television might be the thinnest giant television ever made. I don't want to say that. It feels like hyperbole, and over the next few days I have no doubt that a lot of other televisions are going to use similar tech for similar results, but look at that image above. Note how that 65-inch display is actually thinner than that woman's finger. Now come back and tell me that isn't incredible.