Tagged With nvidia

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Australian PC builders and desktop gaming enthusiasts will be able to buy NVIDIA’s graphics cards directly from the company, rather than only through its OEM partners, with the number one graphics chipmaker setting up an online store for customers and launching it today.

Shared from Lifehacker

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For the past five years, Nvidia has been building itself a shiny new headquarters in the heart of Silicon Valley. When it is completed at the end of this year, the 500,000 square feet structure will house up to 5000 employees across two floors. The site has been specifically designed to encourage collaboration with large congregational areas, open plan offices and staircases to enable chance encounters. During GTC 2017, we were given a sneak peak inside the building which remains a work in progress. Here are the photos.

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Announced at GTC 2017, the Tesla V100 is an enterprise-level processor powered by the Volta GV100 GPU: the first chip in the world built with a 12nm FFN process. A single Volta GV100 packs in 21 billion transistors, 5120 CUDA cores, 320 texture units and a 4096-bit HBM2 memory interface with a boost clock speed of 1455MHz. It's equipped with 640 Tensor Cores capable of providing 120 teraflops of tensor operations. (And yes, it will totally play Crysis - one day.)

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Whether you like it or not, autonomous cars are coming - and Nvidia just made it a lot easier for manufacturers to jump on the self-driving bandwagon. The company's Deep Learning Institute (DLI) is offering advanced hands-on courses to aid in the development of autonomous vehicles. Provided it has enough expertise and money, any company can now build one. Ulp.

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If you have any interest in PC gaming, you've likely heard about two competing technologies by NVIDIA and AMD called G-Sync and FreeSync respectively. Both are designed to eliminate screen tearing, which happens when your monitor's refresh rate can't keep up with the frames being pumped out by your video card. If you've been looking for a definitive comparison, look no further than this opus from Battle(non)sense.

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These days, 1080p is so passe. I don't even get out of bed for anything less than 1440p. But 4K, now, that's where it's at. My new TV is 4K, my next monitor will probably be 4K. 4K is the future, for everything from Netflix to gaming. But gaming at 4K requires a gutsy PC, and that means investing in some top of the line hardware. Want to play the latest games at 4K? Nvidia has got you covered with the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti, a graphics card with a significant jump in power from even last year's already-barnstorming GTX 1080.

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The original Nvidia Shield looked cool and had some neat ideas behind it, but its cost and use of the neglected Android TV operating system left the set-top box/console fusion feeling more like Frankenstein than legitimate answer to either Roku, PS4 or Xbox One. A major software update and some much needed changes to the system peripherals has changed the Nvidia Shield into a legitimate set-top box choice — especially if you're looking to playback 4K HDR content.

Shared from Kotaku

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In front of thousands, the pitch sounded good. Bring PC gaming to the hundreds of millions who can't, or haven't experienced it before. It's a sensible, reasonable goal for a publicly listed company like NVIDIA to aim at. And the idea of putting a gaming PC in the cloud has a certain logic to it.

Problem is, we've been here before. It didn't work. And even if the streaming technology was sound, it still wouldn't work for Australians.

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When I was a kid, self-driving cars were the sci-fi future. They were the stuff of Isaac Asimov's Sally and the Johnny Cab from Total Recall. I didn't actually think that they'd ever happen — the concept itself was a long way from reality, a lot more fi than sci. But smarter brains than mine, with the help of some surprisingly old-school tech, have built cars that can drive on everyday roads.

I took a short trip in one, and it was normal. Normal to the point of being bland — which is what you want from a self-driving car.

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Nvidia started out as a graphics card company. Nvidia basically invented the performance GPU. But Nvidia does a lot more than desktop graphics these days. VR, AR, mixed reality, self-driving and autonomous vehicles, deep learning neural networks — all these use technology that started out running the first 3D-accelerated PC games 20 years ago.

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Not content with making every other technology product under the sun, Samsung now has a gaming laptop in its repertoire. It actually sounds pretty good on paper, too, if you want a powerful 15- or 17-inch machine that'll run double duty for workday tasks and casual PC gaming.

Shared from Kotaku

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Virtual reality finally arrived. Self-driving cars started wandering streets and past red lights. SpaceX aborted a rocket launch four times within a week. Samsung started strong with the Galaxy S7 and finished with the Note7 nuking itself into orbit while you slept.

We had new graphics cards, and most of them were pretty damn good. Consoles broke the mould by releasing new hardware mid-cycle and becoming more like PCs than ever before. And, unsurprisingly, we found out once again that Einstein really knew his shit.

It's been a big year for tech. Let's break down this year's biggest moments.

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Nvidia's recent portable graphics renaissance means you can now get a notebook that can run all the latest games with the same visual fidelity as a proper dekstop PC.

Aorus is Gigabyte's premium gaming brand, and its X5v6 is a phenomenally powerful laptop — overclocked CPU, GTX 1070 graphics, super-fast SSDs — that barely weighs 2.5kg. This might be the lightest hardcore laptop for gaming and VR that you can buy right now.

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Virtual reality is great and all, but it needs a little more space — especially if you're using a room-scale HTC Vive. And that probably means you're going to want to set up your powerful VR gaming PC in an open area like your living room. And that means you're going to want a PC that can hide out of the way in your TV cabinet. Enter the MSI Trident, the world's smallest VR-ready PC.